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If I launch std::async with std::launch::async policy shouldn't it start every async task in a new thread? At the moment it looks that new async tasks move to a thread which just completed it's work. I'm using VC11 as my compiler. As you can see from the output when a new worker (e.g. a worker gets a thread with ID 34500 multiple times) is launched with std::async, it starts in a previously finished thread. Is my understanding of std::async wrong or is there an underlying work stealing queue or something of that sort?

Worker (ID=24072) starting.
Worker (ID=34500) starting.
Worker (ID=32292) starting.
Worker (ID=31392) starting.
Worker (ID=17976) starting.
Worker (ID=31580) starting.
Worker (ID=33512) starting.
Worker (ID=33804) starting.
Worker 32292 finished.
Worker (ID=32292) starting.
Worker 17976 finished.
Worker (ID=17976) starting.
Worker 31580 finished.
Worker (ID=31580) starting.
Worker 34500 finished.
Worker (ID=34500) starting.
Worker 34500 finished.
Worker (ID=34500) starting.
Worker 32292 finished.
Worker (ID=32292) starting.
Worker 17976 finished.
Worker (ID=17976) starting.
Worker 34500 finished.
Worker 17976 finished. 
Worker 31580 finished.
Worker 32292 finished.
Worker 33804 finished.
Worker 31392 finished.
Worker 33512 finished.
Worker 24072 finished.
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I think the implementation is allowed to use a thread pool for new tasks, or atleast that's the intent IIRC. –  Xeo Jul 14 '12 at 1:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If I launch std::async with std::launch::async policy shouldn't it start every async task in a new thread?

The specification requires that the asynchronous operation be executed "as if in a new thread of execution" (C++11 §30.6.8/11). The important words here are: as if.

An already-running worker thread can be reused if and only if the behavior is the same as if a new thread was created. This means, for example, that variables with the thread_local storage class must be reset between asynchronous operations executed on a single thread.

It is not necessary that the thread identifier be reset because a thread identifier only uniquely identifies a thread while it is running. If a thread terminates, another thread may be started with the first thread's identifier.

Is there an underlying work stealing queue or something of that sort?

This is implementation-specific. The Visual C++ 2012 implementation of the C++11 thread support library is built atop the Concurrency Runtime (ConcRT), which includes a work-stealing task scheduler.

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Sweet, I had no idea about ConcRT. Thanks! –  Ynau Jul 14 '12 at 1:51

James is right, with one correction: Microsoft implementation of launch::async is incorrect. This was discussed at length by the C++ concurrency working group in Redmond. Visual C++ 2012 is still in beta, so they will probably change the implementation to be Standard compliant.

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Thanks for the blog link, Bartosz! It would have been cool to attend the study group meeting. From your blog post, it sounds like the reason VC2012 is nonconforming is that it does not reset thread-local state. Is that correct? I just want to make sure I understand the extent of the nonconformance. The last thing I want is to be giving people bad information :-) –  James McNellis Jul 19 '12 at 23:38
    
The destruction of thread locals is one problem. The main question touched on another problem: with a finite fixed thread pool you may get into a deadlock situation. Imagine that all available threads are running tasks that block waiting for the remaining tasks to send them a message. Those remaining tasks, on the other hand, are waiting for pool threads becoming available. This situation would never happen if all tasks that started with launch::async ran concurrently in separate threads. –  Bartosz Milewski Jul 20 '12 at 21:05
    
I just ran out of threads in the std::async TP using Visual C++ 2013 Update 2. An upper limit (didn't make an exact measurement, but it's measured in 10s) was reached, and the pool just wouldn't expand beyond that limit (even with the use of std::launch::async). Switching to std::thread made the limit go away. Didn't expect that behaviour... –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Jul 3 '14 at 12:12

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