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How do i achieve this :

function Vehicle(){
    this.mobility = true;
};
function Car(){};
Car.prototype = new Vehicle();
var myCar = new Car();
console.log(myCar.mobility);

Using objects created with Object literals ?

I know about Object.create() but is there any way like

Car.prototype = new Vehicle();

to achieve that ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's how you do it using __proto__:

var propertiesToInherit = { 'horsepower': 201, 'make': 'Acura' }
var myCar = {};
myCar.__proto__ = propertiesToInherit;

console.log(myCar.horsepower); // 201
console.log(myCar.make); // Acura

That being said, I would avoid doing this. It looks like it is deprecated

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, ya i thought of it. But unfortunately it's deprecated as you said. –  Rafael Adel Jul 14 '12 at 2:11
    
Is there a reason you don't want to use Object.create? Or standard functional inheritance? –  jalbee Jul 14 '12 at 2:15
    
No, but i have read somewhere that Object.create() is an ECMAScript5 feature so i'm worried about cross-browser compatibility. I'm trying to know an alternative to it, in case i had to use object literals not constructors . –  Rafael Adel Jul 14 '12 at 2:20
    
Object.create is the way to go. But you are correct, it is not implemented everywhere. Your best bet is to create a polyfill –  jalbee Jul 14 '12 at 2:22
    
The mozilla website is a GREAT resource for polyfills. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  Ryan Ore May 12 at 13:52

One possibility would be Prototype.js; among other things, it allows you to create and extend JS classes using a cleaner syntax:

// properties are directly passed to `create` method
var Person = Class.create({
  initialize: function(name) {
    this.name = name;
  },
  say: function(message) {
    return this.name + ': ' + message;
  }
});

// when subclassing, specify the class you want to inherit from
var Pirate = Class.create(Person, {
  // redefine the speak method
  say: function($super, message) {
    return $super(message) + ', yarr!';
  }
});

var john = new Pirate('Long John');
john.say('ahoy matey');
// -> "Long John: ahoy matey, yarr!"
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I don't know if I understand your question correctly, but maybe you could try this:

var literal = { mobility: true };
function Car(){};
Car.prototype = literal;
var myCar = new Car();
console.log(myCar.mobility);

Note that if you change the literal, you change all instances of Car that were created.

share|improve this answer
    
Ya, but can it be achieved without making the Car constructor. I mean directly from myCar object. –  Rafael Adel Jul 14 '12 at 1:58
1  
You mean var myCar = literal;? Or maybe you want to copy literal's contents into car? –  Jordão Jul 14 '12 at 2:00
    
I mean can we inherit myCar from literal directly, or somehow other than creating Car constructor, then Car.prototype = literal and instantiating myCar from it? I mean can we create myCar using object literal and then inheriting it from the object literal ? –  Rafael Adel Jul 14 '12 at 2:09
    
Sorry, I didn't quite follow that line of thought... –  Jordão Jul 14 '12 at 2:14
    
Thanks anyways for being patient with me :) –  Rafael Adel Jul 14 '12 at 2:18

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