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Using PHP/MySQL

I'm trying to create a select statement that gets the data from the least day of the current month and year (I'm using it to show data from on a certain player 'this month'). The 1st of the months data may not always exist therefore if the first isn't found then it would use the 2nd or 3rd or so on, whichever is the least month.

The query would need to be something like:

SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE name = '$username' AND
[...theDate = the least day of data in the current month/year]

It would return a single row of data.

This is a query I use for getting the 'this week' data:

SELECT name, data, theDate
FROM table_name
WHERE name = '$username'
AND YEARWEEK(theDate) = YEARWEEK(CURRENT_DATE)
ORDER BY theDate;
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are interested in returning only one row, the easiest way to do this would be:

SELECT t.*
  FROM table_name t
 WHERE t.name = '$username'
   AND t.theDate >= CAST(DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y-%m-01') AS DATE)
   AND t.theDate < DATE_ADD(DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y-%m-01'), INTERVAL 1 MONTH)
 ORDER BY s.name DESC, s.theDate DESC
 LIMIT 1

The ORDER BY is based on the assumption that you have an index on (or with leading columns of) (name,theDate). That would be the most appropriate index for the predicates (i.e. conditions in the WHERE clause. There's really no need for us to sort the name column, since we know it's going to be equal to something... but specifying the ORDER BY in this way makes it more likely MySQL will do a reverse scan operation on the index, to return the rows in the correct order, avoiding a filesort operation.

NOTE: I specify the bare theDate column in the conditions in the WHERE clause, rather than wrapping that in any function... by specifying the bare column and a bounded range, we enable MySQL to make use of an index range scan operation. There are other possible ways to include this condition in the WHERE clause, for example...

DATE_FORMAT(t.theDate,'%Y-%m') = DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y-%m')

which will return an equivalent result, but a predicate like this is not sargable. That is, MySQL can't/won't do a range scan on an index to satisfy this.

If you are intending to get all the rows for the "least" date in a month for a given user (your question doesn't seem to indicate that you need only one row), here's one way get that result:

SELECT t.* 
  FROM table_name t
  JOIN ( SELECT s.name
              , s.theDate
           FROM table_name s 
          WHERE s.name = '$username'
            AND s.theDate >= CAST(DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y-%m-01') AS DATE)
            AND s.theDate < DATE_ADD(DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y-%m-01'), INTERVAL 1 MONTH)
          ORDER BY s.name DESC, s.theDate DESC
          LIMIT 1
       ) r
    ON r.name = t.name
   AND r.theDate = t.theDate 

Again, MySQL can make use of an index (if available) with leading columns (name,theDate) to satisfy the predicates, and to do a reverse scan operation (avoiding a sort), and to do the JOIN operation.

NOTE: We're assuming here that 'theDate' is datatype DATE (with no time component). If it's a DATETIME or a TIMESTAMP, there's a potential for a time component, and that query may not return all rows for a given "date" value, if the time components are different for the rows with the same "date". (e.g. '2012-07-13 17:30' and '2012-07-13 19:55' are different datetime values.) If we want to return both of those rows (because both are a date of "July 13"), we need to do a range scan instead of an equality test.

SELECT t.* 
  FROM table_name t
  JOIN ( SELECT s.name
              , s.theDate
           FROM table_name s 
          WHERE s.name = '$username'
            AND s.theDate >= CAST(DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y-%m-01') AS DATE)
            AND s.theDate < DATE_ADD(DATE_FORMAT(NOW(),'%Y-%m-01'), INTERVAL 1 MONTH)
          ORDER BY s.name DESC, s.theDate DESC
          LIMIT 1
       ) r
    ON t.name = r.name 
   AND t.theDate >= r.theDate
   AND t.theDate < DATE_FORMAT(DATE_ADD(r.theDate,INTERVAL 1 DAY),'%Y-%m-%d')

Note those last two lines... we're looking for any rows with a theDate value that is greater than or equal to the "least" value found for the current month AND that is ALSO less than midnight of the following day.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it works for me, thanks spencer! my query I used is like: "SELECT * FROM player WHERE playerName = '$username' AND theDate >= CAST( DATE_FORMAT( NOW( ) , '%Y-%m-01' ) AS DATE ) ORDER BY theDate LIMIT 1" I can't vote up :( – Jsn0605 Jul 14 '12 at 2:52
    
Your solution should be faster than mine as it avoids passing the theDate column to a function, where it otherwise wouldn't be able to utilize an index. But just as a matter of style, I would use the BETWEEN syntax instead. =) – Zane Bien Jul 14 '12 at 3:38
    
@Zane... good points. I avoid using BETWEEN with DATETIME and TIMESTAMP columns to get rows for a month (e.g.), because I really want to specify the boundaries as "midnight of the first day of the month" and "midnight of the first day of the following month", and I want only values LESS THAN the upper bound, not LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO the upper bound, which is what BETWEEN gets me. To effectively use BETWEEN I would need to subtract 1 second from the upper bound. And with some databases (SQL Server) datetime resolutions are subsecond. I prefer the lb <= col < ub style because it works right. – spencer7593 Jul 14 '12 at 3:52
    
@Zane: the query with the range scan predicates (like mine) will be faster only if there is a suitable index available, and the execution plan generated by the optimizer actually turns out to be faster. But, in general, for large tables, and index range scan on a narrow set of rows usually outperforms a full table (or full index) scan. – spencer7593 Jul 14 '12 at 3:56
    
Just want to note that the 'theDate' column for my specific table has the 'date' datatype. Thanks for all the information! – Jsn0605 Jul 15 '12 at 16:54

Here is a simple solution:

SELECT a.*
FROM table_name a
INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT name, MIN(theDate) AS mindate
    FROM table_name
    WHERE MONTH(theDate) = MONTH(CURDATE()) AND
          YEAR(theDate) = YEAR(CURDATE()) AND
          name = '$username'
    GROUP BY name
) b ON a.name = b.name AND a.theDate = b.mindate
ORDER BY theDate

The inner subselect first selects the minimum date of the current month and current year. This should return exactly one result.

The outer query then joins on this one result, and thus you get the row(s) of the earliest recorded day of the current month & year.

Assuming only one row is generated per player per day, we can simplify even further:

SELECT *
FROM table_name
WHERE MONTH(theDate) = MONTH(CURDATE()) AND
      YEAR(theDate) = YEAR(CURDATE()) AND
      name = '$username'
ORDER BY theDate
LIMIT 1
share|improve this answer
    
I haven't tried this as the other solution worked for me, but thanks for the help. – Jsn0605 Jul 14 '12 at 2:53
2  
Your inner query also needs to check for the correct name. (What if we are looking for user "Foo" who joined on 2012-07-14, but user "Bar" has records dating back to 2012-07-01?) – pilcrow Jul 14 '12 at 3:12
    
@pilcrow, +1 good catch. Thank you for pointing out my mistake. – Zane Bien Jul 14 '12 at 3:16
    
@Zane: just pointing out, that with the YEAR() and MONTH() functions around theDate, MySQL cannot do an index range scan to satisfy those predicates. (I'm certain that` MONTH(theDate) = val` is not sargable, and I'm almost certain that YEAR(theDate) = val is also not sargable. I say almost certain, because MySQL could conceivably change that at some point, by rewriting that as a range scan. We can allow MySQL to use an index range scan operation by using range scan predicates on the bare column. – spencer7593 Jul 14 '12 at 3:37
1  
Does it only once. MySQL only has to be done once, because that expression is deterministic, and doesn't vary depending on any row. It's a different story (of course) if we replace the NOW() and instead reference a column in the table... that's where we run into the "has to be executed for every row"... which is why we put the bare column on one side, and do all the gyrations on the other side with the literal (the NOW() function essentially returns us a literal for the statement. – spencer7593 Jul 14 '12 at 5:24

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