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header file:

class A
{
public:        
    void setNumber(unsigned );
    void changeNumber();  
    unsigned result;

    class B
    {
    public:
        void setResult();
        unsigned valorB;
    };

private:                           
    static unsigned number; 
};

Implementation file:

void A::setNumber(unsigned value)
{
    number = value;
}

void A::changeNumber()
{
    result = number * 5 + 10;
}

void A::B::setResult()
{
    valorB = number + 5;
}

How can I access a variable in the internal class? I know how to access the variables of A, but i don't know how i do to access variables of B.

I want to access "valorB".

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Do you get a compiler error with the above code? If so, what is it? –  Greg Hewgill Jul 14 '12 at 2:56
    
"undefined reference to A::number" –  tiggares Jul 14 '12 at 3:00
    
I didn't know Argument Dependent Lookup works this way also. I believed it works only for namespaces. Was wondering how number can be accessed in different class! –  Ajay Jul 14 '12 at 5:16

2 Answers 2

Declaring a class is not enough, you need an instance of class B to access its variables. For example, you can add a declaration of member variable to class A, like this:

class B
{
public:
    void setResult();
    unsigned valorB;
};
B memberB;

Now you can access valorB like this:

A a;
a.memberB.valorB = 3;

The other problem in your code is lack of definition of a declared static variable number. You need to add this to your CPP:

unsigned A::number;
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I don't think this is the problem, because definition of a method A::B::setResult() does not require an instance. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 14 '12 at 3:03
    
@GregHewgill Indeed, it does not, and it shouldn't need to: A to B is no more than a namespace, and A::B::setResult() provides a definition for a member function that may or may not be called. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 14 '12 at 3:06
    
I'm doing exactly what you said, but for some reason when you print the value in valueB apparently is printing "garbage". The value being printed has no relation to what was implemented. Is there a syntax error in the implementation file? –  tiggares Jul 14 '12 at 3:34
    
@tiggares Did you initialize the value that you are printing? Could you edit the question with your updated code? –  dasblinkenlight Jul 14 '12 at 4:27

Based on the error message you are getting,

undefined reference to A::number

the problem is not related to valorB. The problem is that you have not provided a definition of A::number. Add to your .cpp file:

unsigned A::number;
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