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I encountered a coredump,use gdb xxx core.1234,then "bt",got those message:" 0x6f636d6f in ?? ()",in which the function name is not readable.I want to learn: 1. in what situations does the gdb bt show "??" as function name? 2. how to avoid these "??" and get the readable function name?

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2 Answers 2

The address 0x6f636d6f is almost certainly invalid (i.e, lies outside your process's memory space), and is probably the result of stack corruption -- it corresponds to the ASCII characters ocmo.

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duskwuff,you mean :if it corresponds ot the ascc string,it can not be an valid address of the function?tks –  basketballnewbie Jul 14 '12 at 5:29
    
It's not a given, but it's a very good guess. Most systems won't load code in that address range. –  duskwuff Jul 14 '12 at 5:33
    
If the OP is using a little-endian machine, as is likely, then it actually corresponds to omco. –  caf Jul 14 '12 at 5:58

1 case : stack is corrupt.
2 case : code compiles with optimisations (not sure about it).
3 case : you start gdb wrong (example gdb ./app --core core_name).

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i'm not sure, but stripped binary may cause symbol name stripping. –  Aftnix Jul 14 '12 at 3:48
    
tks,what is stripped binary –  basketballnewbie Jul 14 '12 at 5:18
    
in what situcations does stack get corrupted? –  basketballnewbie Jul 14 '12 at 5:19
    
gnu strip discards all symbols from object files objfile. The list of object files may include archives. At least one object file must be given. strip modifies the files named in its argument, rather than writing modified copies under different names. sources.redhat.com/binutils/docs/binutils/strip.html Stack will be corrupted if code corrupts memory. –  ForEveR Jul 14 '12 at 5:25

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