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Let's say I have a very simple C file (called foo.c):

int main()
{
   printf("foo");
   return 0;
}

Now I call gcc:

gcc foo.c

When I call gcc (with no options, as in the above example), what libraries are linked in by default and where are they located? (On Mac OS X 10.7)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The -v option to gcc will cause it to dump information about the default options it will use including the library paths and default libraries and object files that will be linked in.

If you give the -Wl,--verbose option, gcc will pass the --verbose to the linker which will dump exactly where it's looking for libraries, including both failed and successful searches.

Combine both options, and you'll see exactly what libraries are linked in, and why they're being linked in.

gcc -v foo.c -Wl,--verbose
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On my mac, ld says that --verbose is an unrecognized option –  user1516425 Jul 25 '12 at 23:45
    
@user1516425: oh - when I see gcc, I just assume that GNU ld is involved. Looking at some docs for the Xcode linker, developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Darwin/Reference/…, you might want to see if the -t linker option will do the trick. Some other options to consider can be found under the "Options for introspecting the linker" heading on that page. –  Michael Burr Jul 26 '12 at 0:24

ldd binary_name. http://www.opennet.ru/man.shtml?topic=ldd&category=1&russian=2

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2  
This will show dynamic libraries only. –  David Schwartz Jul 14 '12 at 5:11
2  
Note he said Mac OS X 10.7, where there is no ldd. The equivalent is otool -L. –  Kevin Grant Jul 14 '12 at 5:13

The standard libraries are linked by default. they are located in /usr in linux machines

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2  
PATH is not used for that. –  Zack Jul 14 '12 at 10:22

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