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This is a follow-on to an earlier stackoverflow question (link text).

If you use the default routing definition, which ends with {id}, then if you have an ActionLink whose target is the same method as generated the page the ActionLink is on, the framework automagically includes the id in the callback url, even if you didn't request it.

For example, if you're displaying a page from the following URL:

http://www.somedomain.com/AController/SameMethod/456

and the page cshtml file has an ActionLink like the following:

@Html.ActionLink("some text", "SameMethod", ARouteValueDictionary, SomeHtmlAttributes)

then whether or not you have "id" included in ARouteValueDictionary, it will show up in the generated URL.

This only occurs if you call back to the same method that generated the page in the first place. If you call back to a different method on the same controller the {id} field does not get inserted into the generated URL.

I don't necessarily have a problem with this. But I am curious as to why the designers took this approach.

FYI, I discovered this feature because I'd inadvertently been depending on it in my website design. I have to pass the ID field back to the server, along with a bunch of other information...only I'd never explicitly added the ID information to the RouteValueDictionary. But because most of my callbacks were to the same action method that had generated the page in the first place I was having the information included anyway.

You can imagine my surprise when a new component -- which I was sure was "essentially identical" to what was already working -- failed. But because the new component had a different target action method, the magic went away.

Edit:

Modified the explanation to clarify that including the {id} field in the generated URL is contingent upon calling the same method as generated the page in the first place.

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...the framework automagically includes the id in the callback url, even if you didn't request it.

I would prefer the term "ambiently" over "automagically". You can think of route tokens already in the URL as "ambient" to your HtmlHelper and UrlHelpers.

But I am curious as to why the designers took this approach.

Consider a Controller that groups together, say 5 actions. Those 5 may have links to each other, but not a lot of links outside the group. The simplest overload of Html.Action takes only 2 args: the text to render, and the action name.

This makes shorthand for linking around from action to action within these views. Since they are all on the same controller, and that controller is already in the path for the current action, MVC reuses this value when you don't specify the controller name in the helper method. The same behavior extends to {id}, or any other route token you define.

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Dan, thanks for the quick reply. What I didn't emphasize in my original question is that including the {id} field in the URL generated by the ActionLink is contingent upon calling the same method as was used to generate the page the ActionLink is on. Calling a different action method on the same controller does not result in the {id} field being included. That's how I encountered the problem I have to code around. So the "ambient efficiency" argument doesn't quite hold up. –  user553671 Jul 14 '12 at 17:05
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