Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My lsearch function should find the value 11 in my array. It does not, and I don't know where the error is. Why does this code not find the value 11?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define PF printf
int main() {
    int intcmp(void *ip1, void * ip2);
    void * lsearch(void *key, void *base, int n, int elemSize, 
                   int(* cmpfun)(void *, void *));
    int arr[] = {4, 6, 2, 3, 11, 22, 15};
    int n = sizeof(arr) / sizeof(int);
    int key = 11;
    int *found = lsearch(&key, &arr, n, sizeof(int), intcmp);
    PF("found=%p", found);
    return 1;
}
int intcmp(void *ip1, void * ip2) {
    int *p1 = ip1;
    int *p2 = ip2;
    return *p1 - *p2 == 0;
}
void * lsearch(void *key, void *base, int n, int elemSize, 
               int(* cmpfun)(void *, void *)) {
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < n; i ++) {
        void *elemArr = (char *)base + i * elemSize;
        if(cmpfun(key, elemArr) == 0)
            return elemArr;
    }

    return NULL;
}
share|improve this question
1  
why not me fount 11 ? Because your parents gave you a better name than "Fount 11". Sorry, couldn't resist. –  user1309389 Jul 14 '12 at 5:56
10  
Aliasing printf to PF makes me die a little inside. –  Corbin Jul 14 '12 at 5:57
    
Wouldn't a simple return *ip1 - *ip2 suffice as the whole body of intcmp? Why would he need two more pointers? o__O –  Vinska Jul 14 '12 at 7:46
    
@Vinska You can't subtract a void from a void. But certainly the == 0 is wrong. –  Jim Balter Jul 14 '12 at 12:11
    
@JimBalter actually, the == 0 is superfluous but correct (if you remove the == 0 from lsearch) –  miniBill Jul 14 '12 at 16:21
show 1 more comment

2 Answers 2

There's a few oddities in your code (PF and the way the functions is declared in main yet defined globally), however, the problem is that your logic if inverted in a two places.

if(cmpfun(key, elemArr) == 0)
        return elemArr;

And:

return *p1 - *p2 == 0;

Mentally run through that when the two elements are equal. The == expression will return 1 when the number does actually equal the other. 1 != 0 thus it's not considered found.

Either through a negation in there or just return *p1 - *p2; directly.

share|improve this answer
    
" the way the functions is declared in main yet defined globally" -- Once upon a time it was common to declare global functions locally to the functions that called them. The Bell Labs UNIX code was full of that sort of thing. "Either through [sic] a negation in there" -- a "standard" cmp function returns < 0, 0, or > 0 to allow ordered comparison, so *ip1 - *ip2 is the right solution. –  Jim Balter Jul 14 '12 at 12:15
add comment

I have annotated the code below:

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <string.h> 

// This is bad practice. It makes your code less readable.
// I won't use it below.
#define PF printf 

// Declare this first so a prototype is not needed.
// You violated a C pattern by using `cmp` in the name.
// Comparison functions in C return <0, 0, >0, not a binary value.
// To wit, later you used the comparison correctly.  I've fixed the
// inconsistency.
int intcmp(void *vp1, void *vp2) 
{   // Most C styles have the brace on its own line, unlike Java. Roll with it.
    int *p1 = vp1, *p2 = vp2;
    return *p1 - *p2; 
}

// Search n elements of size elemSize in the array at 
// base in sequence using cmpfun on key, 
// to test for equality (cmpfun == 0).  Return a pointer 
// to the found element or NULL if none.
void *lsearch(void *key, void *base, int n, 
              int elemSize, int(* cmpfun)(void *, void *)) 
{ 
    int i; 

    for (i = 0; i < n; i++) { 
        void *elemArr = (char*)base + i * elemSize; 
        if (cmpfun(key, elemArr) == 0) 
            return elemArr;
    } 
    return NULL; 
}

int main() 
{   
    int arr[] = {4, 6, 2, 3, 11, 22, 15}; 
    int n = sizeof(arr) / sizeof(int); 
    int key = 11; 
    int *found = lsearch(&key, &arr, n, sizeof(int), intcmp); 
    printf("found=%p (%d)", found, *(int*)found); 
    return 0; // By convention zero corresponds to no error.
} 
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.