Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to validate a date mm/dd from a constructor that receives a string variable. I have tried several ways with no luck. Last I tried was to convert string to ascii and validate that way but is not working either:

public Dated(String dateStr)
{
 this.dateStr = dateStr;
 for (int i = 0; i < dateStr.length(); i++)
 {
  char c = dateStr.charAt(i);
  asciiValues = (int) c;      // change each string character to ASCII value

 }

}

public void display()
{
    System.out.println(asciiValues);
}
share|improve this question
2  
mm/dd or which year? How do you handle leap years? –  JB Nizet Jul 14 '12 at 6:21
add comment

1 Answer

As far I know you are troubling in parsing the string values. Right.

In java we have a verity of tools available to validate the things like these.

I will be using SimpleDateFormat Utility class that can validate the date and also convert the Date to String

public class Dated{

  private SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd") // M --> Month; d--> Day

  public Dated(String dateStr) throws Exception{
    try{
      Date d = sdf.parse(dateStr);
      System.out.println( d );
    } catch (ParseException e) {
      // you can throw that exception just to 
      // avoid creating the object of this class
      throw e;
    }
  }
}

But remember that you are not validating the date for Leap Year as mention by @JB Nizet. You can overcome that by validating the Year as well.

In above code if you pass "02/29" you will get the date 1st March. Which is not correct date as 1970 is not a leap year.

So I would include the Year in my date validation as well.

To add the year you can change the SimpleDateFormat as bellow.

private SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy"); // y --> Year
share|improve this answer
1  
You'd better throw ParseException from the constructor, and don't use try/catch at all. –  JB Nizet Jul 14 '12 at 7:09
    
Yes it all depends on the way you want your class Constructor to behave. I added that try/catch so that he can have a good idea. –  Talha Ahmed Khan Jul 14 '12 at 7:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.