Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

You can do this to get implicit conversions to chain:

package language

object chainedImplicits {
  implicit def chainImplicits[A, B, C](a: A)(implicit conv1: A => B, conv2: B => C): C = conv2(conv1(a))
}

but this is obviously not safe.

I can't see anything wrong with this version, though:

package language

package chainedImplicits {

  final class Chained[A, B] private[chainedImplicits] (val f: A => B)

  trait Low { this: `package`.type =>
    implicit def startChaining(implicit conv: A => B): Chained[A, B] = new Chained[A, B](conv)
    implicit def chainImplicits[A, B, C](implicit conv1: Chained[A, B], conv2: B => C): Chained[B, C] = new Chained(conv1.f andThen conv2)
  }

}

package object chainedImplicits extends Low {
  implicit def endChain[A, B](a: A)(implicit conv: Chained[A, B]): B = conv.f(a)
}

Is there a catch here?

share|improve this question
4  
Why is the first code block of code obviously not safe? Could Scala create an infinite chain of implicits by instantiating A and C with the same concrete type? –  Malte Schwerhoff Jul 14 '12 at 9:14
    
@mhs No, because Scala will only invoke an implicit conversion if the code would not type-check otherwise. The danger with the first one is that chains of implicits might not be unique modulo final signature. –  Ptharien's Flame Jul 14 '12 at 10:46
add comment

1 Answer

First, I can't get your first "obviously not safe" example to do anything:

import language.implicitConversions

object Test {
  implicit def chain[A, B, C](a: A)(implicit ab: A => B, bc: B => C): C = bc(ab(a))

  case class X()
  case class Y()
  case class Z()

  implicit def xy(x: X) = Y()
  implicit def yz(y: Y) = Z()

  val z: Z = X()
}

...

type mismatch;
  found   : Test.X
  required: Test.Z
   val z: Z = X()
               ^

Next, the obvious "catch" in your second example is that it doesn't compile. Did you actually try it? Regardless, after "fixing" it, it still doesn't do what you want:

import language.implicitConversions

class Convert[A, B](val convert: A => B) extends AnyVal
trait Convert0 {
  implicit def convert[A, B](implicit ab: A => B): Convert[A, B] = new Convert(ab)
  implicit def convert[A, B, C](implicit ab: Convert[A, B], bc: B => C): Convert[A, C] = new Convert(ab.convert andThen bc)
}
object Convert extends Convert0 {
  implicit def convert[A, B](a: A)(implicit convert: Convert[A, B]): B = convert.convert(a)
}

object Test {
  case class X()
  case class Y()
  case class Z()

  implicit def xy(x: X) = Y()
  implicit def yz(y: Y) = Z()

  val z: Z = X()
}

This gives the same type mismatch error. To my knowledge, if you want implicit conversions to chain, you have to be explicit about it:

import language.implicitConversions

object test {
  case class X()
  case class Y()
  case class Z()

  // anything convertible to X is convertible to Y
  implicit def xy[A <% X](x: A) = Y()

  // anything convertible to Y is convertible to Z
  implicit def yz[B <% Y](y: B) = Z()

  val z: Z = X()
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.