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Is there a way to call TryParse dynamically? Some kind of:

public static bool TryParse<T>(string toConvert, out T result)

Of course one can use Typeonverters for this. However, an invalid conversion will result in an exception and I want to get rid of this.

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marked as duplicate by Ben Voigt Oct 17 '14 at 21:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Maybe you could use something from System.Reflection. I haven't dealt with generics with Reflection, but it might go like get type info, see if TryParse() exists, if so, Invoke(), otherwise return false. –  cyanic Jul 14 '12 at 7:32
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/a/6160588/445517 –  CodesInChaos Jul 14 '12 at 11:27
    
In particular look at stackoverflow.com/a/2961921/103167 Just add copying the result back out. –  Ben Voigt Oct 17 '14 at 21:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could call the TryParse method dynamically using Reflection. This way you won't get a time consuming Exception if the conversion fails.

This method is a slightly optimized version of this one.

    //Try Parse using Reflection
public static bool TryConvertValue<T>(string stringValue, out T convertedValue)
{
    var targetType = typeof(T);
    if (targetType == typeof(string))
    {
        convertedValue = (T)Convert.ChangeType(stringValue, typeof(T));
        return true;
    }
        var nullableType = targetType.IsGenericType &&
                       targetType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof (Nullable<>);
    if (nullableType)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(stringValue))
        {
            convertedValue = default(T);
            return true;
        }
            targetType = new NullableConverter(targetType).UnderlyingType;
    }

    Type[] argTypes = { typeof(string), targetType.MakeByRefType() };
    var tryParseMethodInfo = targetType.GetMethod("TryParse", argTypes);
    if (tryParseMethodInfo == null)
    {
        convertedValue = default(T);
        return false;
    }

    object[] args = { stringValue, null };
    var successfulParse = (bool)tryParseMethodInfo.Invoke(null, args);
    if (!successfulParse)
    {
        convertedValue = default(T);
        return false;
    }

    convertedValue = (T)args[1];
    return true;
}
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Good. A suggestion: In the if (nullableType) block, when you check stringValue for null, maybe you should say string.IsNullOrEmpty(stringValue) instead. The reason I think so is that Nullable<>.ToString() returns "" when HasValue is false. So the empty string might be considered a valid string representation for e.g. (int?)null. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 14 '12 at 8:48
1  
Thanks for the input. However, if you call this method with "" for converting a Nullable<int> the out value will be null and the return value will be false. This is correct as "" should not be a valid value for parsing int?. If I would use string.IsNullOrEmpty the return value would be true, which would not be correct imho. –  Oliver Vogel Jul 14 '12 at 9:09
1  
That's completely OK. But it means that a Nullable<int> will not "round-trip". Suppose you have: int? i = null; string s = i.ToString(); int? tmp; bool canParse = TryConvertValue<bool?>(s, out tmp);. Then canParse will be false even if the string s comes directly from the ToString call of an int?. See also MSDN ToString. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 14 '12 at 10:39
    
Another issue: The out parameter convertedValue should be of type T, not object. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 14 '12 at 10:40
    
Good point, thanks –  Oliver Vogel Jul 14 '12 at 11:23

You can write something like this:

public delegate bool TryParser<T>(string input, out T result);

public static bool TryParse<T>
     (string toConvert, out T result, TryParser<T> tryParser = null)
{
    if (toConvert == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("toConvert");

    // This whole block is only if you really need
    // it to work in a truly dynamic way. You can additionally consider 
    // memoizing the default try-parser on a per-type basis.
    if (tryParser == null)
    {
        var method = typeof(T).GetMethod
                 ("TryParse", new[] { typeof(string), typeof(T).MakeByRefType() });

        if (method == null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Type does not have a built in try-parser.");

        tryParser = (TryParser<T>)Delegate.CreateDelegate
            (typeof(TryParser<T>), method);
    }

    return tryParser(toConvert, out result);
}

And then call it like:

int result;
bool success = TryParse("123", out result);

I really wouldn't recommend this unless you have some scenario that requires it.

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