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I have 2 functions.

function f1() {
    $.ajax(..., success: function(response) {
        // some code executed whenever request is completed.
    }
}

function f2() {
    // my code
}

I need to call these functions one after another.

f1() // waiting until ajax request in the function is complete.
f2()

I tried $.when().then(), however it didn't seem to work.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The $.ajax call returns an instance of $.Deferred which is used to track the progress of the call - that is what you need to return from your f1 function. You can then use .then(), .done() etc.

Edit in response to comments

If you want to invoke a callback within f1 as well as externally you can return the result of the .pipe method.

function f1() {
    return $.ajax(/*...*/).pipe(function() {
        //local 'done' handler
    });
}

function f2(resultFromF1Handler) {
    //...
}

f1().done(f2);
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That work's, however, f2 is still executed a little bit too early. I need to call f2 after ajax request and its callback in f1 is executed. –  aemdy Jul 14 '12 at 8:48
    
@Hvandracas see my edit - updated example with callback in f1 –  Steve Greatrex Jul 14 '12 at 8:55
function f1(onsuccess) 
{
    $.ajax(
    { 
        success: function(r) 
        { 
            // some code
            onsuccess(r);
        }
    });
}

function f2() 
{
    // my code
}

f1(f2);
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This works, but is not as flexible as using $.Deferred: what if you want to attach 2 'success' handlers? Or a 'fail' handler? –  Steve Greatrex Jul 14 '12 at 8:47
    
@Steve, true but workable... function success(){ f2(); f3();} f1(success, fail); –  flem Jul 14 '12 at 8:49
    
+1 If you don't already know how to use deferreds, this is the most straightforward way to call f2() from f1() without f1 knowing any specifics of f2. All it's doing is designing f1() to support calling an arbitrary function after its ajax call succeeds. –  jfriend00 Jul 14 '12 at 8:56

I suggest calling f2() inside the anonymous function that is executed as f1()'s success.

Is there a problem with doing that?

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But that would mean that f1 needs to be aware of f2. By using the $.Deferred, these two functions could be in separate files or separate libraries and still work as the OP desires –  Steve Greatrex Jul 14 '12 at 8:43

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