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I have three classes organized in following manner. Foo is a template class, Bar derived from Foo, and Doo derived from Foo too. All of them implement a doX() member function which is defined in Foo as a virtual function.

I need to have a vector (or any other container) of Bar and Doo objects. For example, a vector of two objects named vec, first element should be a Doo and second should be a Bar. When I call vec[0].doX() Doo::doX() should be called. Defining the vector of pointers to Foo objects, do the job. But I'm not sure where do the instances actually stored. If I put pointers to objects, the allocated memory may be released after leaving the scope that objects are created in.

I prepared a minimal working example for illustrating the problem:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class Foo
{
public:
    virtual void doX(){cout<<"doX from Foo"<<endl;}
};

template <typename T>
class Bar : public Foo<T>
{
public:
    void doX(){cout<<"doX from Bar"<<endl;}
    void g(string const &input);    // some test function may be used in doX
    int x;                          // some test data may be used in doX
};

template <typename T>
class Doo : public Foo<T>
{
public:
    void doX(){cout<<"doX from Doo"<<endl;}
};

void doSomething(vector<Foo<int>* >& target)
{
    Foo<int> X;
    // do some extreme job to generate X
    target.push_back(&X); // ==> This is problematic
}

int main()
{
    Foo<int> f;
    Bar<int> b;
    Doo<int> d;
    vector<Foo<int> > v;
    v.push_back(f);
    v.push_back(b);
    v.push_back(d);
    v[0].doX();             // doX from Foo
    v[1].doX();             // doX from Foo
    v[2].doX();             // doX from Foo
    vector<Foo<int>*> v2;
    v2.push_back(&f);       // here is no problem, but if `f` is generated inside
                            // a function that receives a reference to `vec` there
                            // will be problems
    doSomething(v2);        // This is problematic
    v2.push_back(&b);
    v2.push_back(&d);
    v2[0]->doX();           // doX from Foo
    v2[1]->doX();           // doX from Foo but dangerous! May crash
    v2[2]->doX();           // doX from Bar
    v2[3]->doX();           // doX from Doo

    return 0;
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have correctly identified the problem. You have to make sure that the instances that are pointed to by the pointers in your vector live at least as long as the vector itself. You can store pointers to dynamically allocated objects, which means that you are in charge of controlling their lifetime. This can be achieved by storing pointers to instances created with new, or better still, smart pointers thereof.

void addElements(vector<Foo<int>* >& target)
{
    target.push_back(new Bar<int>());
    target.push_back(new Doo<int>());
}

In the above example, you have to make sure to delete the elements of the vector when you are done (typically before the vector goes out of scope).

A C++11 example with std::unique_ptrs:

std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Foo<int>> v;
v.push_back(std::unique_ptr<Foo<int>>(new Bar<int>()); // moves the unique_ptr
v.push_back(std::unique_ptr<Foo<int>>(new Doo<int>()); // moves the unique_ptr
v.emplace_back(new Bar<int>()); // constructs the unique_ptr in place
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't heard about smart pointers before. Above code solves my problem for now. I'm going to google <memory> header. Thanks –  sorush-r Jul 14 '12 at 9:04
1  
@sorush-r you may need C++11 for <memory>, but boost and TR1 provide some smart pointers too. –  juanchopanza Jul 14 '12 at 9:06

I'm not sure if I understand your problem right, but what is the problem in doing the following:

Foo<int> *x = new ...; // e.g. new Bar<int>()
target.push_back(x);

This will store the value of x on the heap instead of the stack. The object x will live until you explicitly delete if (with delete x). When you don't need the object anymore, you have to call delete x, or that part of the memory will never bee freed, so you will have memory leaks.

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You are storing your instances as value references in your vector. This will use the implicit copy constructor to construct Foo objects from your Bar and Doo instances.

You seem to be looking to store references to the objects instead (as you have tried to do in the later part of your example). However, in order to do this, you can not use stack allocated objects from the doSomething function, as these are deallocated once the function returns.

One way to solve this is to use smart pointers:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <tr1/memory> // assuming g++ now

using namespace std;
using namespace std::tr1;

template <typename T>
class Foo
{
public:
    virtual ~Foo(){}
    virtual void doX(){cout<<"doX from Foo"<<endl;}
};

template <typename T>
class Bar : public Foo<T>
{
public:
    void doX(){cout<<"doX from Bar"<<endl;}
    void g(string const &input);    // some test function may be used in doX
    int x;                          // some test data may be used in doX
};

template <typename T>
class Doo : public Foo<T>
{
public:
    void doX(){cout<<"doX from Doo"<<endl;}
};

void doSomething(vector<shared_ptr<Foo<int> > >& target)
{
    Foo<int> X;
    // do some extreme job to generate X
    shared_ptr<Foo<int> > foo(new Foo<int>);
    target.push_back(foo);
}

int main()
{
    Foo<int> f;
    Bar<int> b;
    Doo<int> d;
    vector<Foo<int> > v;
    v.push_back(f);
    v.push_back(b);
    v.push_back(d);
    v[0].doX();             // doX from Foo
    v[1].doX();             // doX from Foo
    v[2].doX();             // doX from Foo
    vector<shared_ptr<Foo<int> > > v2;
    v2.push_back(shared_ptr<Foo<int> >(new Foo<int>));
    doSomething(v2);
    v2.push_back(shared_ptr<Foo<int> >(new Bar<int>));
    v2.push_back(shared_ptr<Foo<int> >(new Doo<int>));
    v2[0]->doX();           // doX from Foo
    v2[1]->doX();           // doX from Foo
    v2[2]->doX();           // doX from Bar
    v2[3]->doX();           // doX from Doo

    return 0;
}
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Since the theory has already been explained, i'll just post one more code example

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class Foo
{
public:
    virtual void doX(){cout<<"doX from Foo"<<endl;}
};


template <typename T>
class Bar : public Foo<T>
{
public:
    void doX(){cout<<"doX from Bar"<<endl;}
    void g(string const &input);   
    int x;                        
};

template <typename T>
class Doo : public Foo<T>
{
public:
    void doX(){cout<<"doX from Doo"<<endl;}
};

typedef boost::shared_ptr<Foo<int> >Ptr;

void doSomething(vector<Ptr>& target)
{
    target.push_back(Ptr(new Foo<int>));
}

int main()
{
    Foo<int> f;
    Bar<int> b;
    Doo<int> d;

    vector<Ptr> v;

    v.push_back(Ptr(new Foo<int>()));
    doSomething(v2); 
    v.push_back(Ptr(new Bar<int>(b)));
    v.push_back(Ptr(new Doo<int>(d)));

    v[0]->doX();         
    v[1]->doX();        
    v[2]->doX();       
    v[3]->doX();      

    return 0;
}
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For containers of polymorphic objects you have two choices (now):

  • with C++11: the typical stl containers, with unique_ptr: std::vector< std::unique_ptr<T> >
  • or simply, the Boost Pointer Containers: boost::ptr_vector<T>

I would personally favor the Boost Pointer Containers here. They have been crafted for this purpose and provide additional guarantees (such as non-nullity) and specific sugar coating (dereferencing an iterator yields a T&, not a std::unique_ptr<T>& that you need dereference once more).

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