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Is it bad to have multiple $(document).ready(function() {}); on your page? I have a website where I load different things at different times. I fire off those partial postback functions inside $(document).ready() but i have about 4 or 5 on the page at once. Is this a bad practice? Specifically, will it cause any performance issues?

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closed as not constructive by Gordon May 9 '13 at 21:47

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4 Answers 4

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This answer is no longer relevant. Please see other posts below for more up-to-date jQuery $.ready() impacts. This post is over 3 years old.

See: http://jsperf.com/docready/11

The answer is no! You can litter them as much as you want (note the word litter). They just become a queue of events that are called when the ready event is triggered.

http://www.learningjquery.com/2006/09/multiple-document-ready

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The answer is actually "Yes it deters performance":

http://jsperf.com/docready/3

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You're drawing conclusions based on your opinion. The answer is that there is a performance hit (everything has a performance hit) and that hit should be weighed against the benefits of it. Even with IE8 it would take 20K $.ready calls to slow down my page by 1 second. The 50 - 100 that I do use would result in an increase of about 0.0025 seconds on IE or 0.000125 seconds on Chrome. –  umassthrower May 9 '13 at 21:21

No it is fine to have as many as you want. A shorter, much more elegant way to do this is $(function(){}) though.

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If it's on the same page I would personally put them all in the same place so that you can't be caught out by forgetting one of the things happening on load.

I doubt the performance implications are that significant though. Have you tried benchmarking the page with them all together and apart?

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