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I have classes:

class IntegerVector:
{
    IntegerVector operator * (const int scalar) const;
};

class RealVector:
{
    RealVector(const IntegerVector &other);
    RealVector operator * (const double scalar) const;
};

How can I force the expression: integer_vector*1.5 to be equivalent to RealVector(integer_vector)*1.5 rather than integer_vector*int(1.5) as it is now?

EDIT

BTW, there are lots of these operators, so defining RealVector IntegerVector::operator * (const double scalar) const is not very satisfactory.

share|improve this question
    
Hm. Mb use RealVector(integer_vector) * 1.5? –  ForEveR Jul 14 '12 at 9:08
    
Haha, of course, but no, I meant implicit conversion. :-) –  Panayiotis Karabassis Jul 14 '12 at 9:13
    
Implicit conversion will be available only if there is operator RealVector() in IntegerVector... –  ForEveR Jul 14 '12 at 9:15
    
How about changing to IntegerVector operator * (RealVector real); where the implementation can control the real to scalar conversion –  Chethan Jul 14 '12 at 9:16
1  
i`m wrong. no explicit constructor is sufficient. –  ForEveR Jul 14 '12 at 9:23
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C++11, you could leverage the built-in type promotion like this:

#include <type_traits>

class IntegerVector;
class RealVector;

template <class T> struct VectorForType {};
template <> struct VectorForType<int> {typedef IntegerVector type;};
template <> struct VectorForType<double> {typedef RealVector type;};

// This is where we figure out what C++ would do..
template <class X, class Y> struct VectorForTypes
{
  typedef typename VectorForType<decltype(X()*Y())>::type type;
};


class IntegerVector
{
public:
    template <class T> struct ResultVector
    {
      typedef typename VectorForTypes<int, T>::type type;
    };

    template <class T>
    typename ResultVector<T>::type operator*(const T scalar) const;
};

class RealVector
{
public:
    template <class T> struct ResultVector
    {
      typedef typename VectorForTypes<double, T>::type type;
    };

    RealVector();
    RealVector(const IntegerVector &other);

    template <class T>
    typename ResultVector<T>::type operator*(const T scalar) const;
};


int main()
{
  IntegerVector v;
  auto Result=v*1.5;
  static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(Result), RealVector>::value, "Oh no!");
}

If you need this without decltype, you can probably implement the type promotion result as a meta-function too. I suppose an operator implementation would look something like this:

template <class T> inline
typename ResultVector<T>::type IntegerVector::operator*(const T scalar) const
{
  typename ResultVector<T>::type Result(this->GetLength());
  for (std::size_t i=0; i<this->GetLength(); ++i)
    Result[i]=(*this)*scalar;
  return Result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very good! I'd like not to switch to C++11, so I am going to find a way to determine the result type of X()*Y() without decltype. –  Panayiotis Karabassis Jul 14 '12 at 12:33
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You can use something like this... This is solution, but very strange, but i cannot invent something better.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

class IntegerVector;

class RealVector
{
public:
    RealVector(const IntegerVector &other) { }
    RealVector operator * (const double scalar) const { std::cout << "RealV called" << std::endl;  return *this; }
};

class IntegerVector
{
public:
    IntegerVector operator * (const int scalar) const
    {
       std::cout << "IntV called" << std::endl;
       return *this;
    }
    template<typename T>
    typename std::conditional<std::is_same<T, int>::value, IntegerVector, RealVector>::type
    operator * (const T scalar) const
    {
       decltype(operator *<T>(scalar)) object(*this);  
       return object * scalar;
    }
};

int main()
{
   IntegerVector v;
   v * 1.5;
}

http://liveworkspace.org/code/b72cde05ca287042300f4aff0f185a42

share|improve this answer
    
Not bad at all! –  ltjax Jul 14 '12 at 10:18
    
Nice. +1, but I think I have to accept the other answer. –  Panayiotis Karabassis Jul 14 '12 at 12:29
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