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i am looking for a sample code implementation on how to invert a 4x4 matrix. i know there is gaussian eleminiation, LU decomposition, etc. but instead of looking at them in detail i am really just looking for the code to do this.

language ideally C++, data is available in array of 16 floats in cloumn-major order.

thank you!

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3  
Is this homework? If not (e.g. you're just trying to solve Ax=b), then trying to explicitly compute an inverse may not be what you want to do. –  Tim Whitcomb Jul 18 '09 at 19:46
7  
it is not homework. it is for a personal project. and i dont want to "waste" time on learning matrix inversion for 4x4 which seems quite complicated compared to 3x3 –  clamp Jul 18 '09 at 20:59
6  
I do not think this is a stupid question that deserves -1 score. –  stribika Jul 18 '09 at 21:19

8 Answers 8

up vote 47 down vote accepted

here:

bool gluInvertMatrix(const double m[16], double invOut[16])
{
    double inv[16], det;
    int i;

    inv[0] = m[5]  * m[10] * m[15] - 
             m[5]  * m[11] * m[14] - 
             m[9]  * m[6]  * m[15] + 
             m[9]  * m[7]  * m[14] +
             m[13] * m[6]  * m[11] - 
             m[13] * m[7]  * m[10];

    inv[4] = -m[4]  * m[10] * m[15] + 
              m[4]  * m[11] * m[14] + 
              m[8]  * m[6]  * m[15] - 
              m[8]  * m[7]  * m[14] - 
              m[12] * m[6]  * m[11] + 
              m[12] * m[7]  * m[10];

    inv[8] = m[4]  * m[9] * m[15] - 
             m[4]  * m[11] * m[13] - 
             m[8]  * m[5] * m[15] + 
             m[8]  * m[7] * m[13] + 
             m[12] * m[5] * m[11] - 
             m[12] * m[7] * m[9];

    inv[12] = -m[4]  * m[9] * m[14] + 
               m[4]  * m[10] * m[13] +
               m[8]  * m[5] * m[14] - 
               m[8]  * m[6] * m[13] - 
               m[12] * m[5] * m[10] + 
               m[12] * m[6] * m[9];

    inv[1] = -m[1]  * m[10] * m[15] + 
              m[1]  * m[11] * m[14] + 
              m[9]  * m[2] * m[15] - 
              m[9]  * m[3] * m[14] - 
              m[13] * m[2] * m[11] + 
              m[13] * m[3] * m[10];

    inv[5] = m[0]  * m[10] * m[15] - 
             m[0]  * m[11] * m[14] - 
             m[8]  * m[2] * m[15] + 
             m[8]  * m[3] * m[14] + 
             m[12] * m[2] * m[11] - 
             m[12] * m[3] * m[10];

    inv[9] = -m[0]  * m[9] * m[15] + 
              m[0]  * m[11] * m[13] + 
              m[8]  * m[1] * m[15] - 
              m[8]  * m[3] * m[13] - 
              m[12] * m[1] * m[11] + 
              m[12] * m[3] * m[9];

    inv[13] = m[0]  * m[9] * m[14] - 
              m[0]  * m[10] * m[13] - 
              m[8]  * m[1] * m[14] + 
              m[8]  * m[2] * m[13] + 
              m[12] * m[1] * m[10] - 
              m[12] * m[2] * m[9];

    inv[2] = m[1]  * m[6] * m[15] - 
             m[1]  * m[7] * m[14] - 
             m[5]  * m[2] * m[15] + 
             m[5]  * m[3] * m[14] + 
             m[13] * m[2] * m[7] - 
             m[13] * m[3] * m[6];

    inv[6] = -m[0]  * m[6] * m[15] + 
              m[0]  * m[7] * m[14] + 
              m[4]  * m[2] * m[15] - 
              m[4]  * m[3] * m[14] - 
              m[12] * m[2] * m[7] + 
              m[12] * m[3] * m[6];

    inv[10] = m[0]  * m[5] * m[15] - 
              m[0]  * m[7] * m[13] - 
              m[4]  * m[1] * m[15] + 
              m[4]  * m[3] * m[13] + 
              m[12] * m[1] * m[7] - 
              m[12] * m[3] * m[5];

    inv[14] = -m[0]  * m[5] * m[14] + 
               m[0]  * m[6] * m[13] + 
               m[4]  * m[1] * m[14] - 
               m[4]  * m[2] * m[13] - 
               m[12] * m[1] * m[6] + 
               m[12] * m[2] * m[5];

    inv[3] = -m[1] * m[6] * m[11] + 
              m[1] * m[7] * m[10] + 
              m[5] * m[2] * m[11] - 
              m[5] * m[3] * m[10] - 
              m[9] * m[2] * m[7] + 
              m[9] * m[3] * m[6];

    inv[7] = m[0] * m[6] * m[11] - 
             m[0] * m[7] * m[10] - 
             m[4] * m[2] * m[11] + 
             m[4] * m[3] * m[10] + 
             m[8] * m[2] * m[7] - 
             m[8] * m[3] * m[6];

    inv[11] = -m[0] * m[5] * m[11] + 
               m[0] * m[7] * m[9] + 
               m[4] * m[1] * m[11] - 
               m[4] * m[3] * m[9] - 
               m[8] * m[1] * m[7] + 
               m[8] * m[3] * m[5];

    inv[15] = m[0] * m[5] * m[10] - 
              m[0] * m[6] * m[9] - 
              m[4] * m[1] * m[10] + 
              m[4] * m[2] * m[9] + 
              m[8] * m[1] * m[6] - 
              m[8] * m[2] * m[5];

    det = m[0] * inv[0] + m[1] * inv[4] + m[2] * inv[8] + m[3] * inv[12];

    if (det == 0)
        return false;

    det = 1.0 / det;

    for (i = 0; i < 16; i++)
        invOut[i] = inv[i] * det;

    return true;
}

This was lifted from MESA implementation of the GLU library.

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21  
Ugh, that code makes me want to stab out my eyes. –  Imagist Jul 18 '09 at 20:56
5  
You probably wouldn't want it any other way. –  shoosh Jul 19 '09 at 0:06
1  
Yes I would. Compilers are perfectly capable of unrolling loops, especially when you tell them to. –  Imagist Jul 19 '09 at 5:34
24  
Sadly, that code isn't really that straightforward to make in a loopable way to begin with, much less a way that a compiler can adequately unroll. Also, that code comes from a rather old C library which has a LOT of very fiddly optimizations, and it's code that works already (and has been thoroughly tested and proven by thousands of Linux OpenGL programs at this point) so why rewrite it? –  fluffy Aug 22 '11 at 20:18
7  
Zoomulator: Awesomely it is for both! This is because inverse(transpose(A)) = transpose(inverse(A)). –  Timmmm Feb 15 '12 at 20:52

If you're looking for 'just works' implementation that is also very optimized without the need to understand the code, I highly reccommend using Intel's optimized SSE matrix inverse routine described here. There's also a reference impelementation for both gaussian elimination and Cramer's rule in C.

I warn though, the SSE code is not pretty if you don't understand MMX/SSE intrinsics.

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Upvoted for its helpfulness in SSE, although it'd be nice if it weren't Intel-specific. –  fluffy Aug 22 '11 at 20:23
    
@fluffy: If you want a non-Intel version of matrix inverse, see github.com/LiraNuna/glsl-sse2/blob/master/source/mat4.h#L324 –  LiraNuna Aug 23 '11 at 19:10
    
this code is from the last century so some things could have been changed with the new cpu's, but the basics keep of course the same –  Quonux Jun 28 '13 at 23:21

Here is a small (just one header) C++ vector math library (geared towards 3D programming). If you use it, keep in mind that layout of its matrices in memory is inverted comparing to what OpenGL expects, I had fun time figuring it out...

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You can use the GNU Scientific Library or look the code up in it.

Edit: You seem to want the Linear Algebra section.

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i did infact look at the matrix struct from gsl, but it doesnt seem to have a function for determinant or inversion. –  clamp Jul 18 '09 at 19:43

If you need a C++ matrix library with a lot of functions, have a look at Eigen library - http://eigen.tuxfamily.org

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There appears to be a VB version at this place.

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I 'rolled up' the MESA implementation (also wrote a couple of unit tests to ensure it actually works).

Here:

float invf(int i,int j,const float* m){

    int o = 2+(j-i);

    i += 4+o;
    j += 4-o;

    #define e(a,b) m[ ((j+b)%4)*4 + ((i+a)%4) ]

    float inv =
     + e(+1,-1)*e(+0,+0)*e(-1,+1)
     + e(+1,+1)*e(+0,-1)*e(-1,+0)
     + e(-1,-1)*e(+1,+0)*e(+0,+1)
     - e(-1,-1)*e(+0,+0)*e(+1,+1)
     - e(-1,+1)*e(+0,-1)*e(+1,+0)
     - e(+1,-1)*e(-1,+0)*e(+0,+1);

    return (o%2)?inv : -inv;

    #undef e

}

bool inverseMatrix4x4(const float *m, float *out)
{

    float inv[16];

    for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<4;j++)
            inv[j*4+i] = invf(i,j,m);

    double D = 0;

    for(int k=0;k<4;k++) D += m[k] * inv[k*4];

    if (D == 0) return false;

    D = 1.0 / D;

    for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++)
        out[i] = inv[i] * D;

    return true;

}

I wrote a little about this and display the pattern of positive/negative factors on my blog.

As suggested by @LiraNuna, on many platforms hardware accelerated versions of such routines are available so I'm happy to have a 'backup version' that's readable and concise.

Note: this may run 3.5 times slower or worse than the MESA implementation. You can shift the pattern of factors to remove some additions etc... but it would lose in readability and still won't be very fast.

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FOR 3x3 MATRIX

CHANGE THE CODE ACCORDING TO YOUR REQUIREMENT

http://www.dreamincode.net/code/snippet1156.htm

Update:

Yes... Going from 3x3 to 4x4 seems like a big difference ... this answer is not correct for this.

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11  
No need to yell. –  jason Jul 18 '09 at 19:39
3  
going from 3x3 to 4x4 seems like a big difference –  clamp Jul 18 '09 at 19:45
2  
To clarify matt's point, that code mentions that it calculates the determinant as part of the algorithm for finding the inverse. There are simplified rules for calculating the determinants of 2x2 and 3x3 matrices that do not apply to larger matrices. –  las3rjock Jul 18 '09 at 20:31

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