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I have a controller and I want two roles to be able to access it. 1-admin OR 2-moderator

I know you can do [Authorize(Roles="admin, moderators")] but I have my roles in an enum. With the enum I can only authorize ONE role. I can't figure out how to authorize two.

I have tried something like [Authorize(Roles=MyEnum.Admin, MyEnum.Moderator)] but that wont compile.

Someone once suggested this:

 [Authorize(Roles=MyEnum.Admin)]
 [Authorize(MyEnum.Moderator)]
 public ActionResult myAction()
 {
 }

but it doesn't work as an OR. I think in this case the user has to be part of BOTH roles. Am I overlooking some syntax? Or is this a case where I have to roll my own custom authorization?

share|improve this question
4  
Interesting. How you were able to get this to work even with only one role in an enum? Does MyEnum.Admin return a string? I'm trying to do the same thing as you, and I've been running into a couple of problems: - I can't set up a string type enum. - I can't call ToString() on the enum e.g. [Authorize(Roles=MyEnum.Admin.ToString())] Both of the above examples gives me compiler errors. If you can advise how you got this to work, that would be appreciated. Thx. –  Johnny Oshika Oct 23 '09 at 18:57
    
@JohnnyO - I have the same problem, did you manage to find out what we are doing wrong? @codette - could you give us a tip here? –  UpTheCreek Oct 31 '09 at 19:01
    
I'm sorry but I never went with any of these solutions. So I changed my code so that only one role needs to be checked. The higher their role is the more they can do. For example, a "normal" user can do a few things. A "moderator" can do all the things a "normal" user can and more. An "admin" can do everything a "normal" user and "moderator" can and more. –  codette Nov 4 '09 at 7:50

7 Answers 7

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Try using the bit OR operator like this:

[Authorize(Roles= MyEnum.Admin | MyEnum.Moderator)]
public ActionResult myAction()
{
}

If that doesn't work, you could just roll your own. I currently just did this on my project. Here's what I did:

public class AuthWhereRole : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Add the allowed roles to this property.
    /// </summary>
    public UserRole Is;

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks to see if the user is authenticated and has the
    /// correct role to access a particular view.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="httpContext"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        if (httpContext == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("httpContext");

        // Make sure the user is authenticated.
        if (!httpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
            return false;

        UserRole role = someUser.Role; // Load the user's role here

        // Perform a bitwise operation to see if the user's role
        // is in the passed in role values.
        if (Is != 0 && ((Is & role) != role))
            return false;

        return true;
    }
}

// Example Use
[AuthWhereRole(Is=MyEnum.Admin|MyEnum.Newbie)]
public ActionResult Test() {}

Also, make sure to add a flags attribute to your enum and make sure they are all valued from 1 and up. Like this:

[Flags]
public enum Roles
{
    Admin = 1,
    Moderator = 1 << 1,
    Newbie = 1 << 2
    etc...
}

The left bit shifting gives the values 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and so on.

Well, I hope this helps a little.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! Just what I needed! Thanks. –  Kamyar Apr 26 '11 at 9:06
1  
What if the user might belong to more than one role? –  ssmith Aug 29 '11 at 20:54
    
What value do I need to have in my database so that I select the Admin, Moderator or Newbie ? (db.users.role = 1 ; 2 ; 4 ; 8... ? –  Misi Jul 9 '12 at 10:48
    
Using this solution you may have only 32 roles which may be ORed together. May be limiting (and for me it is). Better solution is the one from @ZaidMasud. –  Zoka Jan 14 '14 at 1:09

Here is a simple and elegant solution which allows you to simply use the following syntax:

[AuthorizeRoles(MyEnum.Admin, MyEnum.Moderator)]

When creating your own attribute, use the params keyword in your constructor:

public class AuthorizeRoles : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public AuthorizeRoles(params MyEnum[] roles)
    {
        ...
    }
    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        ...
    }
}

This will allow you to use the attribute as follows:

[AuthorizeRoles(MyEnum.Admin, MyEnum.Moderator)]
public ActionResult myAction()
{
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I believe, this should be an accepted solution, as it works, and you are not limited to 32 roles at maximum in accepted answer. Thank you for this. –  Zoka Jan 14 '14 at 1:07

I combined a few of the solutions here to create my personal favorite. My custom attribute just changes the data to be in the form that SimpleMembership expects and lets it handle everything else.

My roles enum:

public enum MyRoles
{
    Admin,
    User,
}

To create roles:

public static void CreateDefaultRoles()
{
    foreach (var role in Enum.GetNames(typeof(MyRoles)))
    {
       if (!Roles.RoleExists(role))
       {
            Roles.CreateRole(role);
        }
    }
}

Custom attribute:

public class AuthorizeRolesAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public AuthorizeRolesAttribute(params MyRoles[] allowedRoles)
    {
        var allowedRolesAsStrings = allowedRoles.Select(x => Enum.GetName(typeof(MyRoles), x));
        Roles = string.Join(",", allowedRolesAsStrings);
    }
}

Used like so:

[AuthorizeRoles(MyRoles.Admin, MyRoles.User)]
public ActionResult MyAction()
{
    return View();
}
share|improve this answer

Try

public class CustomAuthorize : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public enum Role
    {
        DomainName_My_Group_Name,
        DomainName_My_Other_Group_Name
    }

    public CustomAuthorize(params Role[] DomainRoles)
    {
        foreach (var domainRole in DomainRoles)
        {
            var domain = domainRole.ToString().Split('_')[0] + "_";
            var role = domainRole.ToString().Replace(domain, "").Replace("_", " ");
            domain=domain.Replace("_", "\\");
            Roles += ", " + domain + role;
        }
        Roles = Roles.Substring(2);
    }       
}

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    [CustomAuthorize(Role.DomainName_My_Group_Name, Role.DomainName_My_Other_Group_Name)]
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here's my version, based on @CalebHC and @Lee Harold's answers.

I've followed the style of using named parameters in the attribute and overridden the base classes Roles property.

@CalebHC's answer uses a new Is property which I think is unnecessary, because AuthorizeCore() is overridden (which in the base class uses Roles) so it makes sense to use our own Roles as well. By using our own Roles we get to write Roles = Roles.Admin on the controller, which follows the style of other .Net attributes.

I've used two constructors to CustomAuthorizeAttribute to show real active directory group names being passed in. In production I use the parameterised constructor to avoid magic strings in the class: group names are pulled from web.config during Application_Start() and passed in on creation using a DI tool.

You'll need a NotAuthorized.cshtml or similar in your Views\Shared folder or unauthorized users will get an error screen.

Here is the code for the base class AuthorizationAttribute.cs.

Controller:

public ActionResult Index()
{
  return this.View();
}

[CustomAuthorize(Roles = Roles.Admin)]
public ActionResult About()
{
  return this.View();
}

CustomAuthorizeAttribute:

// The left bit shifting gives the values 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and so on.
[Flags]
public enum Roles
{
  Admin = 1,
  User = 1 << 1    
}

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class CustomAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
  private readonly string adminGroupName;

  private readonly string userGroupName;

  public CustomAuthorizeAttribute() : this("Domain Admins", "Domain Users")
  {      
  }

  private CustomAuthorizeAttribute(string adminGroupName, string userGroupName)
  {
    this.adminGroupName = adminGroupName;
    this.userGroupName = userGroupName;
  }

  /// <summary>
  /// Gets or sets the allowed roles.
  /// </summary>
  public new Roles Roles { get; set; }

  /// <summary>
  /// Checks to see if the user is authenticated and has the
  /// correct role to access a particular view.
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="httpContext">The HTTP context.</param>
  /// <returns>[True] if the user is authenticated and has the correct role</returns>
  /// <remarks>
  /// This method must be thread-safe since it is called by the thread-safe OnCacheAuthorization() method.
  /// </remarks>
  protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
  {
    if (httpContext == null)
    {
      throw new ArgumentNullException("httpContext");
    }

    if (!httpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
    {
      return false;
    }

    var usersRoles = this.GetUsersRoles(httpContext.User);

    return this.Roles == 0 || usersRoles.Any(role => (this.Roles & role) == role);
  }

  protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
  {
    if (filterContext == null)
    {
      throw new ArgumentNullException("filterContext");
    }

    filterContext.Result = new ViewResult { ViewName = "NotAuthorized" };
  }

  private IEnumerable<Roles> GetUsersRoles(IPrincipal principal)
  {
    var roles = new List<Roles>();

    if (principal.IsInRole(this.adminGroupName))
    {
      roles.Add(Roles.Admin);
    }

    if (principal.IsInRole(this.userGroupName))
    {
      roles.Add(Roles.User);
    }

    return roles;
  }    
}
share|improve this answer
    
In case anyone actually tries to use this attribute with constructor injection, it won't work because attributes are created via the reflection API - see this post for more info. The code posted above was a first cut before getting it working with DI. –  meataxe Oct 18 '12 at 2:00
    
In the end, I decided not to use DI with this because the lib I'm using (Autofac + Autofac.MVC4) only supports what I'm trying to achieve in a beta version, which I do not want to use. Here's a link about how to do this kind of thing with Autofac.MVC4 beta. My final version did away with the constructor arguments, and I converted adminGroupName and userGroupName into const. –  meataxe Oct 18 '12 at 20:58

To add to CalebHC's code and answer ssmith's question about handling users who have multiple roles...

Our custom security principal returns a string array representing all the groups/roles that a user is in. So first we have to convert all the strings in the array that match items in the enum. Finally, we look for any match - if so, then the user is authorized.

Note that we're also redirecting an unauthorized user to a custom "NotAuthorized" view.

The whole class looks like this:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = true)] 
public class CustomAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Add the allowed roles to this property.
    /// </summary>
    public Roles Is { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks to see if the user is authenticated and has the
    /// correct role to access a particular view.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="httpContext"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        if (httpContext == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("httpContext");

        if (!httpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
            return false;

        var iCustomPrincipal = (ICustomPrincipal) httpContext.User;

        var roles = iCustomPrincipal.CustomIdentity
                        .GetGroups()
                        .Select(s => Enum.Parse(typeof (Roles), s))
                        .ToArray();

        if (Is != 0 && !roles.Cast<Roles>().Any(role => ((Is & role) == role)))
        {
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        if (filterContext == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("filterContext");

        filterContext.Result = new ViewResult { ViewName = "NotAuthorized" };
    } 
}
share|improve this answer

Or you could concatenate like:

[Authorize(Roles = Common.Lookup.Item.SecurityRole.Administrator + "," + Common.Lookup.Item.SecurityRole.Intake)]

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Magic strings? Really? –  Zaid Masud Jun 15 '12 at 9:26

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