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How can I create a typedef using a macro (#define)?

I am, for various reasons, trying to use a macro to do typedef'ing in C. Something along the lines of templates for C++.

As an example, I would expect the preprocessor to expand the #define and typedef a struct whose "content" member is of type char:

#define DEFINE_FOO_TYPE(content_type__, content_type_name__) \
typedef struct {                                             \
        content_type__ content;                              \
} content_type_name__

DEFINE_FOO_TYPE(char, foo_t);

foo_t foo_var;
foo_var.content = 'g';

Apparently that is not the case. Is it possible to do these sort of things in C at all, or is the only way a C++ template?

To preempt questions along the lines of "why don't you just use a C++ template?". The answer is that I'm trying to do it in C because it's fun.

share|improve this question
    
So what is problem with the above? – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 14 '12 at 11:13
4  
You are typedeffing a struct called 'element_type_name__' instead of the passed parameter 'content_type_name__' – Tom Knapen Jul 14 '12 at 11:15
1  
Yes, you've a typo as @TomKnapen points out. Fix that and you're sorted but remember you'll get no type checking. If you're doing this in C++ you should definitely use templates instead. – Component 10 Jul 14 '12 at 11:23
    
I've corrected the example. It was a typo. But the question still stands. Compiling the above makes gcc say "error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before ‘.’ token" – colding Jul 14 '12 at 11:25
3  
Surely you are not just pasting that quoted code into gcc, are you? You can't just execute code outside any function. Put the last line inside a function. – DanielKO Jul 14 '12 at 11:36
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I posted in a comment because I thought it was too trivial, but here it is:

Surely you are not just pasting that quoted code into gcc, are you? You can't just execute code outside any function. Put the last line inside a function.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

#define DEFINE_FOO_TYPE(content_type__, content_type_name__) \
typedef struct {                                             \
    content_type__ content;                              \
} content_type_name__

DEFINE_FOO_TYPE(char, foo_t);

int main() {
    foo_t foo_var;
    foo_var.content = 'g';
    return 0;
}

I.e. use content_type_name__ instead of element_type_name__

Proof of compilation

share|improve this answer
    
OK, that was a stupid typo on my part, but the question still stands. I've corrected the example. – colding Jul 14 '12 at 11:23
2  
@colding No, the question obviously doesn't still stand, since the corrected code works ... or rather, it would work if you put executable code inside a function. – Jim Balter Jul 14 '12 at 11:41
    
@JimBalter, you are correct. DanielKO is getting the mark as he spottet the issue a few minuttes before you did. Otherwise thanks. – colding Jul 14 '12 at 12:13
    
@colding Tom Knapen deserves at least as much credit as DanielKO. Note that, other than for formatting or other clarity, you should not edit code after posting it, as it invalidates people's responses. – Jim Balter Jul 14 '12 at 12:22

simply put the last two lines of code into main() or any function it will work for sure.

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