Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
__global__ void add( int *c, const int* a, const int* b )
{
    int x = blockIdx.x;
    int y = blockIdx.y;
    int offset = x + y * gridDim.x;
    c[offset] = a[offset] + b[offset];
}

In the above example, I guess x, y, offset are saved in registers while

  • nvcc -Xptxas -v gives 4 registers, 24+16 bytes smem

  • profiler shows 4 registers

  • and the head of ptx file:

    .reg .u16 %rh<4>;
    .reg .u32 %r<9>;    
    .reg .u64 %rd<10>;  
    .loc    15  21  0   
    
    $LDWbegin__Z3addPiPKiS1_:   
    .loc    15  26  0  
    

Can anyone clarify the usage of registers? In Fermi, the maximum number of registers is 63 for each thread. In my program I want to test the case when a kernel consumes too many registers (so variables may have to be stored in local memory automatically and thus leads to performance decrease). Then at this point I can split one kernel into two so that each thread has enough registers. Assume that the SM resources are sufficient for concurrent kernels.

I'm not sure if I am right.

share|improve this question
    
Is your question "Why does this code use 4 registers instead of 3?" If so, the answer is this: In order to add a[offset] and b[offset], both of those values must be fetched. It has to store whichever one it fetched first someplace while it's fetching the other. So one more register is needed. – David Schwartz Jul 14 '12 at 12:20
    
Thank you for your answer, so can we say intermediate variables will be saved in registers? – user1525320 Jul 14 '12 at 12:37
    
When necessary, yes. It's not always easy to tell when that's necessary and it can even vary based on the hardware target. – David Schwartz Jul 14 '12 at 12:38
1  
Got it :-P since the register usage is sophisticated, is there a way to find the boundary of register usage for a kernel, since I wish to test the case of Register Spilling, but when I try to declare more variables, the register usage remains the same. – user1525320 Jul 14 '12 at 13:12
up vote 13 down vote accepted

The register allocation in PTX is completely irrelevant to the final register consumption of the kernel. PTX is only an intermediate representation of the final machine code and uses static single assignment form, meaning that each register in PTX is only used once. A piece of PTX with hundreds of registers can compile into a kernel with only a few registers.

Register assignment is done by ptxas as a completely standalone compilation pass (either statically or just-in-time by the driver, or both) and it can perform a lot of code reordering and optimisations on the input PTX to improve throughput and conserve registers, meaning that there is little or no relationship between the variables in the original C or registers in PTX and the final register count of the assembled kernel.

nvcc does provide some ways to influence the register allocation behaviour of the assembler. You have __launch_bounds__ to provide heuristic hints to the compiler which can influence register allocation, and the compiler/assembler takes the -maxrregcount argument (at the potential expense of register spilling to local memory, which can lower performance). The volatile keyword used to make a difference to older versions of the nvopen64 based compiler and could influence the local memory spill behaviour. But you can't arbitrarily control or steer register allocation in the original C code or PTX assembly language code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot,talonmies. so I guess there is nothing we can do about the register usage control in our kernel? The compiler always does a lot. – user1525320 Jul 14 '12 at 13:38
    
You have __launch_bounds__ to provide heuristic hints to the compiler which can influence register allocation, and the compiler/assembler takes the -maxrregcount argument. The volatile keyword used to make a difference to older versions of the nvopen64 compiler and could influence the local memory spill behaviour. But you can't arbitrarily control or steer register allocation in the original C code. – talonmies Jul 14 '12 at 14:23
    
This helps a lot! Thanks again man. – user1525320 Jul 14 '12 at 14:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.