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I know that we can access private constructor via Reflection as @Sanjay T. Sharma mentioned in his answer of my question: Does “instanceof Void” always return false?

However, @duffymo said:

you can access private everything with reflection - methods, ctors, data members, everything.

  1. How can I access the private methods and the private data members?
  2. Is it possible to access local variable via Reflection?
  3. Is there any way to prevent anyone from accessing private constructors, methods, and data members?
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1  
Local variables live on the stack, not the heap, so this is a totally different concept. But interesting question anyway. –  Thilo Jul 14 '12 at 12:21
    
1. has duplicates all over, for example: stackoverflow.com/questions/1555658/… –  Thilo Jul 14 '12 at 12:22
    
@Thilo That's only data members, what about the methods? Is it the same way? –  Eng.Fouad Jul 14 '12 at 12:24
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/880365/… –  Thilo Jul 14 '12 at 12:30
1  
(You can se a SecurityManager to make things behave properly. (And you can access local fields through debugging/tooling interfaces or bytecode injection.)) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 16 '12 at 12:53
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2 Answers 2

up vote 22 down vote accepted

1) How can I access the private methods and the private data members?

You can do it with little help of setAccessible(true) method

class Dummy{
    private void foo(){
        System.out.println("hello foo()");
    }
    private int i=10;
}
class Test{
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Dummy d=new Dummy();

        /*---  [INVOKING PRIVATE METHOD]  ---*/
        Method m=Dummy.class.getDeclaredMethod("foo");
        //m.invoke(d);//exception java.lang.IllegalAccessException
        m.setAccessible(true);//Abracadabra 
        m.invoke(d);//now its ok

        /*---  [GETING VALUE FROM PRIVATE FIELD]  ---*/
        Field f=Dummy.class.getDeclaredField("i");
        //System.out.println(f.get(d));//not accessible now
        f.setAccessible(true);//Abracadabra 
        System.out.println(f.get(d));//now its ok

        /*---  [SETTING VALUE OF PRIVATE FIELD]  ---*/
        Field f2=Dummy.class.getDeclaredField("i");
        //f2.set(d,20);//not accessible now
        f2.setAccessible(true);//Abracadabra 
        f2.set(d,20);//now its ok
        System.out.println(f2.get(d));
    }
}

2) Is it possible to access local variable via Reflection?

No. Local variables cannot be accessed outside block in which they ware created, unless you put that variables outside by yourself (for example you will store them in some field)

3) Is there any way to prevent anyone from accessing private constructors, methods, and data members?

I think for constructors or methods you could use stacktrace to check if it was invoked by Reflection.
For fields I cant find solution to prevent accessing them via Reflection.

[WARNING: this is not approved by anyone, just wrote it inspired by your question.]

class Dummy {
    private void safeMethod() {
        try {
            throw new Exception();
            // if method was invoked by reflection stack trace would be simmilar
            // to something like this:
        /*
        java.lang.Exception
            at package1.b.Dummy.safeMethod(SomeClass.java:38)
            at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
            at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
            at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
        ->  at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:601)
            at package1.b.Test.main(SomeClass.java:65)
        */
        //5th line marked by "->" is inerresting so I will try to use that info

        } catch (Exception e) {
            StackTraceElement[] st = e.getStackTrace();
            if (st.length > 5
                && st[4].getClassName().equals("java.lang.reflect.Method"))
                throw new RuntimeException(
                        "method safeMethod() is accessible only by Dummy object");
        }

        // now normal code of method
        System.out.println("code of safe method");
    }

    //I will check if it is possible to normally use that method inside this class
    public void trySafeMethod(){
        safeMethod();
    }

    Dummy() {
        safeMethod();
    }
}

class Dummy1 extends Dummy {}

class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Dummy1 d1 = new Dummy1();//safeMethod can be invoked inside superclass constructor
        d1.trySafeMethod();//safeMethod can be invoked inside other Dummy class methods 
        System.out.println("-------------------");

        //Lets check if it is possible to invoke it via reflection
        Method m2 = Dummy.class.getDeclaredMethod("safeMethod");
        // m.invoke(d);//exception java.lang.IllegalAccessException
        m2.setAccessible(true);
        m2.invoke(d1);
    }
}

Output from Test main method :

code of safe method
code of safe method
-------------------
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:601)
    at package1.b.Test.main(MyClass2.java:87)
Caused by: java.lang.RuntimeException: method safeMethod() is accessible only by Dummy object
    at package1.b.Dummy.safeMethod(MyClass2.java:54)
    ... 5 more
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2  
+1 interesting answer. –  Eng.Fouad Jul 14 '12 at 13:34
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  1. Using the method shown in the answer you linked to: setAccessible(true), which is a method of the superclass of Field, Constructor and Method.
  2. No.
  3. No, unless the code runs in a JVM you control, where you install a security manager. But if you give someone a jar file, and he uses the classes from this jar file, he'll be able to access everything.
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+1 so this is one of the cons of Java? You cannot protect your <strike>classes</strike> code. –  Eng.Fouad Jul 14 '12 at 12:38
9  
I don't think this is specific for Java. You cannot protect "your" code from the user that runs it. DRM implementations struggle with that fact, too. Remote execution (SaaS) is probably the only "solution" for that. Either way, information hiding in OOP is not a security feature to keep secrets, but a convenience for the programmer to not have to see and accidentally mess with implementation internals. –  Thilo Jul 14 '12 at 12:42
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