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I am taking an experimental first shot at writing a simple side-scroller game. I have this code for re-centering the screen if the player moves too far in some direction.

Is there a better way to write it? I feel like I am abusing the language, but it worked out so nicely that I think it might be okay.

public void adjustFrameIfNecessary()
{
    int dx, dy;
    if ((dx = (GAME_WIDTH - GAME_WIDTH / 3) - player.x) < 0 || (dx = GAME_WIDTH / 3 - player.x) > 0 || (dx = 0) == 0);
    if ((dy = (GAME_HEIGHT - GAME_HEIGHT / 3) - player.y) < 0 || (dy = GAME_HEIGHT / 3 - player.y) > 0 || (dy = 0) == 0);

    if(dx != 0 || dy != 0)
    {
        for (Drawable shiftMe : drawables)
        {
            shiftMe.unconditionalShift(dx, dy);
        }
    }

}

EDIT

With regards to everyone's input, in an attempt to make it more readable, I have changed it to this

public void adjustFrameIfNecessary()
{
    int dx, dy;

    assignX:
    {
        dx = (GAME_WIDTH - GAME_WIDTH / 3) - player.x;
        if(dx < 0) break assignX;
        dx = GAME_WIDTH / 3 - player.x;
        if(dx > 0) break assignX;
        dx = 0;
    }

    assignY:
    {
        dy = (GAME_HEIGHT - GAME_HEIGHT / 3) - player.y;
        if(dy < 0) break assignY;
        dy = GAME_HEIGHT / 3 - player.y;
        if(dy > 0) break assignY;
        dy = 0;
    }

    if (dx != 0 || dy != 0)
    {
        for (Drawable shiftMe : drawables)
        {
            shiftMe.unconditionalShift(dx, dy);
        }
    }

}

Is this better?

EDIT 2

public void adjustFrameIfNecessary()
{
    int dx = calculateShift(GAME_WIDTH, frameReference.x);
    int dy = calculateShift(GAME_HEIGHT, frameReference.y);

    if (dx != 0 || dy != 0)
    {
        for (Drawable shiftMe : drawables)
        {
            shiftMe.unconditionalShift(dx, dy);
        }
    }
}

I think that it is clear now. Thanks everyone.

share|improve this question
8  
Yes, burying multiple assignments inside an if conditional is difficult to read, and is therefore going to be difficult to maintain in the future. You should try to avoid that. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 14 '12 at 13:56
5  
It's not very readable, imo. –  AHungerArtist Jul 14 '12 at 13:56
    
in the recent years i changed my coding style to be more naive. and this is exactly the advice i would give you: write programs so that your code reflects your intentions as directly as possible. no user of an application ever complained that the source is longer than necessary, and i don't think many programmers do this either. no need to cram as much as possible into a single line. even though i have to admit it feels great, i still don't suggest doing it :) p.s. the second version is worse by a lot. –  kritzikratzi Jul 14 '12 at 16:31
    
Have to agree, the second version is not even anymore readable and it's more verbose. –  AHungerArtist Jul 17 '12 at 13:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unreadable, but I get your point. One thing, though: why not reuse the same check for both x and y? And by using the ternary operator you get one hack less.

static int toBounds(int max, int curr) {
  int ret;
  return ((ret = (max - max/3) - curr) < 0 || (ret = max/3 - curr) > 0)? ret : 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
GAME_WIDTH and GAME_HEIGHT are not necessarily the same. –  nullUser Jul 14 '12 at 14:26
1  
This is a function you'll call twice: first time with GAME_WIDTH, second time with `GAME_HEIGHT. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 14 '12 at 14:28
    
I think a function call is too expensive. This method is called so often that I want at little overhead as possible. Unless there is some way that I can guarantee the java compiler will make it inline, then I wouldn't want to do this. –  nullUser Jul 14 '12 at 14:32
1  
There will be no function call once HotSpot inlines it. You really should NOT go for that level of optimization. Just make sure it's a static method to make HotSpot's decision easier. Or make it a private method. These are practically guaranteed to get inlined. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 14 '12 at 14:34
    
maybe look at my solution. i like where this is going, but i think in this very case making it a tad bit more abstract clears these weird x/3, makes the code more understandable and in fact gives you a function that should be useful in different places as well (you know... the kind of function that you can actually copy&paste to another project) –  kritzikratzi Jul 14 '12 at 16:56

I'm not sure I understand why you have those if statements at the top at all. You should simply assign the variables when you initialize them.

dx = (GAME_WIDTH - GAME_WIDTH / 3) - player.x)
dy = (GAME_HEIGHT - GAME_HEIGHT / 3) - player.y)

They're going to be assigned to that regardless in your if statement. If it rearches the third condition then it already is zero, so there is no reason to assign it. discard the two if statements and instead stick to just straight variable assignment. Keep the condition above the for loop, that is the only check you need to make.

share|improve this answer
1  
You have missed the subtlety of that code, which just proves how readable it is. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 14 '12 at 14:19
    
If it reaches the third block of the if it doesn't have to be zero... Look more closely at the if, it isn't symmetric. –  nullUser Jul 14 '12 at 14:20
    
Plus the first two comparisons are not at all the same. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 14 '12 at 14:25

Your if statements are confusing to read. If you (or anyone else) need to change it at a later time, it might be very difficult and error prone.

It is a good habit to make code that not only works, but is maintainable. Since you got it to work, you should make it more maintainable.

Break the if statements in to variables that makes sense and use multiple lines. You aren't writing for a golf code contest?

You'll thank yourself later.

share|improve this answer

how about this?

/* calculate offset to center */
dx = X_current_center - player.x;
dy = Y_current_center - player.y;

if (abs(dx) > MARGIN || abs(dy) > MARGIN)
    /* recenter */
share|improve this answer
    
i think MARGIN would be GAME_WIDTH/6. but note that you still have to compute how far you want to shift. so in a way it's avoiding the original question. –  kritzikratzi Jul 14 '12 at 16:50
    
@kritzikratzi the point here is to show that you don't need to use nested ifs but assign the values and depending on the values do the action. The question of recentering I would put that into a separate function called recenter. depending on what you want: always center the player (easy) or split up the area in quadrants calculate the quadrant and make a switch based on the quadrant. –  Alex Jul 14 '12 at 20:05
    
i hear you, but figuring out whether recentering is required and to what extent it is required are very much the same computations. i myself wouldn't tear those two appart ... –  kritzikratzi Jul 16 '12 at 13:58

the idea to improve such code is usually to use math :)

first of all, sorry for the long post. if you ever meet me in person don't ask me about this topic, i won't stop talking.

short version

do this:

/**
 * Computes the distance from a point x to an interval [a,b]
 */
public static int distanceToInterval( int x, int a, int b ){
   return x<a? (a-x): ( x>b? (b-x):0 ); 
   // alternative: 
   // return Math.max( a - x, 0 ) + Math.min( b - x, 0 ); 
}

// then use as 
int dx = distanceToInterval( player.x, GAME_WIDTH/3, GAME_WIDTH*2/3 ); 
int dy = distanceToInterval( player.y, GAME_HEIGHT/3, GAME_HEIGHT*2/3 ); 

long version

your initial statement

if ((dx = (GAME_WIDTH - GAME_WIDTH / 3) - player.x) < 0 || 
    (dx = GAME_WIDTH / 3 - player.x) > 0 || 
    (dx = 0) == 0);

this can be cleaned up a bit by making it into a ...

...longer version

dx1 = GAME_WIDTH*2/3 - player.x; 
dx2 = GAME_WIDTH*1/3 - player.x; 
dx3 = 0; 

if( dx1 < 0 ) dx = dx1; 
else if( dx2 > 0 ) dx = dx2; 
else dx = dx3; 

this is imho a lot clearer. i can now see what you're trying to do and put it in a neat sentence: if the player is not inside the center third of the screen, we'd like to move the screen

make it even more clear

if( player.x < GAME_WIDTH/3 ) dx = GAME_WIDTH/3 - player.x;  // positive num
else if( player.x > GAME_WIDTH*2/3 ) dx = GAME_WIDTH*2/3 - player.x; // negative num
else dx = 0; // no shift

you can see i reordered your statement, i check the left boundary first, then the right one. if you come a country that reads from right to left you might find the other direction more intuitive :)

THIS is the solution i would pick. it's short, it's readable, it's perfect :)

however, if you want it more concise you could go a step further

do the math tricks

you need to understand that the three cases are completely exclusive, they can't ever happen at the same time. let's go back to using more variables:

// on the left side we shift a positive number, or not at all 
dx1 = Math.max( GAME_WIDTH/3 - player.x, 0 ); 
// on the right side we shift a negative amount, or not at all 
dx2 = Math.min( GAME_WIDTH*2/3 - player.x, 0 ); 

now look at the beauty of this:

  • if GAME_WIDTH/3-player.x > 0, then GAME_WIDTH*2/3 - player.x > 0 thus Math.min(...,0) = 0
  • if GAME_WIDTH*2/3 - player.x < 0, then GAME_WIDTH*1/3 - player.x < 0 thus Math.max(...,0) = 0

this means you can simply add the two to compute the total shift. and this is what your code will look like:

int dx = 
     Math.max( GAME_WIDTH/3 - player.x, 0 ) + // too far to the left? 
     Math.min( GAME_WIDTH*2/3 - player.x, 0 ); // or too far to the right? 

a little more abstraction

whatever variant you chose, it's now insanely easy to put this in a method. but let's make it a bit more meaningful than this special case. i would suggest

/**
 * Computes the distance from a point x to an interval [a,b]
 */
public static int distanceToInterval( int x, int a, int b ){
   return 
       Math.max( a - x, 0 ) + // too far to the left? 
       Math.min( b - x, 0 ); // or too far to the right? 
}

// now use as 
int dx = distanceToInterval( player.x, GAME_WIDTH/3, GAME_WIDTH*2/3 ); 
int dy = distanceToInterval( player.y, GAME_HEIGHT/3, GAME_HEIGHT*2/3 ); 

p.s. please note that i've replaced GAME_WIDTH - GAME_WIDTH/3 by GAME_WIDTH*2/3 throughout this post. these two give slightly different results with integer math, but i just prefer the short version as i find it more intuitive ("two thirds of the screen" vs "the entire screen and then one third back").

share|improve this answer
    
maybe i start to obsess about this question too much, but: assume you already have the very common clamp function, i.e. public static int clamp( int x, int a, int b ){ return x < a? a : (x>b?b:x); } this will always give you a value inside the interval [a,b]. either a value is inside the interval, in this case clamp(x)=x. or it is outside the interval, in this case the difference between the original value and the clamped value is exactly the shift you're looking for. public int distanceToInterval( int x, int a, int b ){ return clamp( x, a, b ) - x; } –  kritzikratzi Jul 14 '12 at 17:15
    
Unfortunately I must say that none of this is an undisputed improvement. You slightly vary the degrees of freedom, rewrite expressions to about equally long other expressions... in the end it's still a matter of personal preference which version to pick. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 14 '12 at 17:35
    
neither are short expressions favorable, nor was that part of the question. anyways, also there is an undisputed difference between readability and one-liners (maybe it's just not as important to you as it is to me :) ) –  kritzikratzi Jul 14 '12 at 18:13
1  
I kind of like the last one, but it should be parameterized with frame dimension and margin instead of interval. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 14 '12 at 18:39
    
oh, yes :) that's my mathematical background i guess ... (math just seems to have terms for all of these basic things) –  kritzikratzi Jul 16 '12 at 14:00

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