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I want to pass an array of long long to an objective c function. I would like the array to be passed as a pointer, if possible, so that copying is not done. I wrote this code:

+ (int) getIndexOfLongLongValue: (long long) value inArray: (long long []) array size: (int) count
{
    for (int i =0; i < count; i++)
    {
       if (array[i] == value)
           return i + 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

to which I pass

long long varname[count];

as the second argument. I am wondering if I can pass this array as a pointer or if this method is fine. I don't need pointers to long longs but pointers to the array.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is being passed in as a pointer (language pedantry notwithstanding); nothing's getting copied. type[] is, for the most part, the same thing as type*.

To confirm this, check out sizeof(array) in the method. You'll see it's the same size as sizeof(void*).

If you really want a pointer to the array, i.e. a pointer to a pointer to the long longs, you'll need to use something like type**; but the only reason to want to do this is if you want to modify the underlying array pointer from the method, which is hardly ever the case.

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Thanks, but I still don't understand fully. Lets say I have an array of 1000 items (as an example) and I pass it into this function. Does the memory used increase only by the size of one pointer - 4-8 bytes? –  user1122069 Jul 14 '12 at 16:36
    
(long long *)array is the same as (long long []) array? –  user1122069 Jul 14 '12 at 16:40
    
The array lives on the heap (usually). When you call the function, all you pass in is a pointer --- the location of the array. (It's actually quite hard to pass an array by value in C/C++/Objective C; you won't do it by accident.) Both long long* and long long[], when used as parameter types, represent pointers. –  David Given Jul 14 '12 at 19:14

C arrays always decay to pointers when passed to a function or a method, so it is not copied in your example. A pointer to long long is automatically a pointer to an array of long long, by virtue of the operator [] being applicable to all pointers. Since your method does not modify the array, you may want to add const to highlight this fact in your API; other than that, your method is fine.

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Could you expand on what "decaying" means here. Decaying from what? What does an array define what a pointer doesn't? –  Michel Müller Jul 14 '12 at 16:14
    
I think he means here by decay that the type becomes just a pointer whereas before is was a pointer that was called an array. –  user1122069 Jul 14 '12 at 16:38
    
@MichelMüller See this question for an explanation. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 14 '12 at 18:19

Objective-C is just an extremely thin wrapper around regular C, so this is handled the same as it would be handled in C: passing by reference.

+ (int)getIndexOfLongLongValue:(long long)value inArray:(long long *)array size:(int)count
{
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        if (array[i] == value)
            return i + 1;
    }
}

Then in the code that calls the function: int myIndex = [object getIndexOfLongLongValue: aValue inArray: varname size: count];

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