Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my service:

InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.Single,
ConcurrencyMode = ConcurrencyMode.Multiple

I have one method that returns an ID by searching something at the service computer. This method can't be act like ConcurrencyMode.Multiple. What do I do?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand your question correctly, you want a service that uses ConcurrencyMode = ConcurrencyMode.Multiple but you also want a method that is single threaded.

Just use locking in the service method

private object getIdLock = new object();
public int GetId()
{
    lock(getIdLock)
    {
        // do your stuff in here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
but what heppends to the aother clients that cant get in to that lock? Do they wait until the first one is finished? –  Stav Alfi Jul 14 '12 at 16:17
    
Or even put [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)] on the method, then you can never accidentally go outside the lock. –  Jeroen Jul 14 '12 at 16:17
2  
[MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)] is bad practice and should be avoided as it can easily lead to deadlocks if someone locks on your service object. This attribute is essentially a lock(this) on the entire method. See the note on the MSDN documentation page: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Jf Beaulac Jul 14 '12 at 16:30
    
@StavAlfi Yes, only 1 thread (1 client with your config) can run the lock block at a time –  Jf Beaulac Jul 14 '12 at 16:31
    
[MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)] locks all my service so no client can even use aother methods. this is not a good solution. by the way, puting the property getIDlock in the service is a bit ugly. is there something else? –  Stav Alfi Jul 14 '12 at 16:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.