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I might not be searching for the correct terms, but I'll try to explain what I am looking for (probably common).

In Windows to create a window you usually go through WinMain(), but not all platforms (Linux, OS X, etc) use this function as an entry point to the program.

While I know there are a lot of libraries out there, I'm more curious about the implementation for educational reasons and not looking for a 3rd party library to handle this for me.

The implementation of this is huge I'm sure, but I'm curious on a more abstract level, how would you write your entry point to be able to handle window creation on multiple platforms.

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Don't reinvent the wheel, particularly that one as it is way more complicated than you can imagine. Just use a portable windowing library (Qt, GTK, wxwidgets...) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 14 '12 at 16:13
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas - I'm interested in how it works, not how to implement it. –  afuzzyllama Jul 14 '12 at 16:14
    
... and if you're interested in the implementation, read one of those existing implementations to start with –  Useless Jul 14 '12 at 16:14
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Typically a toolkit has a bunch of classes that represent windows, edit boxes, etc. and standard methods on them. Then they have a separate implementation for every platform of all the low-level bits of each of these classes. Creating such a toolkit is a huge job. –  arx Jul 14 '12 at 16:18
    
@arx - I'm not interested in a toolkit, I'm interested in getting a blank window up to attach a DirectX or OpenGL context to. –  afuzzyllama Jul 14 '12 at 16:21

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm curious on a more abstract level, how would you write your entry point to be able to handle window creation on multiple platforms.

The entry point of a C++ program is main, and that is cross platform. After that, you will need to use the specific library you need to create the windows and anything else. Different platforms/libraries can provide a main function for you that will perform the initialization and then call a specific function (WinMain in the case of windows)

You might want to take a look at this question regarding WinMain.

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After looking over that question, it makes a lot more sense. Thanks for clearing it up! –  afuzzyllama Jul 14 '12 at 16:27

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