Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Are there any libraries out there to mock localStorage?

I've been using Sinon.JS for most of my other javascript mocking and have found it is really great.

My initial testing shows that localStorage refuses to be assignable in firefox (sadface) so I'll probably need some sort of hack around this :/

My options as of now (as I see) are as follows:

  1. Create wrapping functions that all my code uses and mock those
  2. Create some sort of (might be complicated) state management (snapshot localStorage before test, in cleanup restore snapshot) for localStorage.
  3. ??????

What do you think of these approaches and do you think there are any other better ways to go about this? Either way I'll put the resulting "library" that I end up making on github for open source goodness.

share|improve this question
11  
You missed #4: Profit! – Chris Laplante Jul 14 '12 at 16:27

10 Answers 10

Here is a simple way to mock it with Jasmine:

beforeEach(function () {
  var store = {};

  spyOn(localStorage, 'getItem').andCallFake(function (key) {
    return store[key];
  });
  spyOn(localStorage, 'setItem').andCallFake(function (key, value) {
    return store[key] = value + '';
  });
  spyOn(localStorage, 'clear').andCallFake(function () {
      store = {};
  });
});

If you want to mock the local storage in all your tests, declare the beforeEach() function shown above in the global scope of your tests (the usual place is a specHelper.js script).

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - you could do this with sinon as well. The key is why bother tying to mock the entire localStorage object, just mock the methods (getItem and/or setItem) you are interested in. – s1mm0t Apr 5 '13 at 7:38
6  
Heads up: There seems to be an issue with this solution in Firefox: github.com/pivotal/jasmine/issues/299 – fwielstra Oct 17 '13 at 13:28
1  
I get a ReferenceError: localStorage is not defined (running tests using FB Jest and npm) … any ideas how to work around? – FeifanZ May 31 '14 at 3:03
1  
Try spying on window.localStorage – Benj Feb 8 '15 at 22:12
1  
for Jest I used this module: npmjs.com/package/node-localstorage – pherris Apr 16 '15 at 15:00

just mock the global localStorage / sessionStorage (they have the same API) for your needs.
For example:

 // Storage Mock
  function storageMock() {
    var storage = {};

    return {
      setItem: function(key, value) {
        storage[key] = value || '';
      },
      getItem: function(key) {
        return storage[key] || null;
      },
      removeItem: function(key) {
        delete storage[key];
      },
      get length() {
        return Object.keys(storage).length;
      },
      key: function(i) {
        var keys = Object.keys(storage);
        return keys[i] || null;
      }
    };
  }

And then what you actually do, is something like that:

// mock the localStorage
window.localStorage = storageMock();
// mock the sessionStorage
window.sessionStorage = storageMock();
share|improve this answer
1  
Edit suggestion: getItem must return null when value does not exist: return storage[key] || null;; – Yashua Nov 25 '15 at 17:47
3  
As of 2016, It seems this does not work in modern browsers (checked Chrome and Firefox); overriding localStorage as a whole is not possible. – jakub.g Jan 13 at 17:41
    
Any updates on what is possible? – Carlos Pliego 2 days ago

Also consider the option to inject dependencies in an object's constructor function.

var SomeObject(storage) {
  this.storge = storage || window.localStorage;
  // ...
}

SomeObject.prototype.doSomeStorageRelatedStuff = function() {
  var myValue = this.storage.getItem('myKey');
  // ...
}

// In src
var myObj = new SomeObject();

// In test
var myObj = new SomeObject(mockStorage)

In line with mocking and unit testing, I like to avoid testing the storage implementation. For instance no point in checking if length of storage increased after you set an item, etc.

Since it is obviously unreliable to replace methods on the real localStorage object, use a "dumb" mockStorage and stub the individual methods as desired, such as:

var mockStorage = {
  setItem: function() {},
  removeItem: function() {},
  key: function() {},
  getItem: function() {},
  removeItem: function() {},
  length: 0
};

// Then in test that needs to know if and how setItem was called
sinon.stub(mockStorage, 'setItem');
var myObj = new SomeObject(mockStorage);

myObj.doSomeStorageRelatedStuff();
expect(mockStorage.setItem).toHaveBeenCalledWith('myKey');
share|improve this answer
    
I realize it's been a while since I've looked at this question -- but this is in fact what I ended up doing. – Anthony Sottile Nov 23 '13 at 4:25
    
This is the only worthwhile solution, as it does not have such a high risk of breaking in time. – oligofren Jul 12 at 21:38

This is what I do...

var mock = (function() {
  var store = {};
  return {
    getItem: function(key) {
      return store[key];
    },
    setItem: function(key, value) {
      store[key] = value.toString();
    },
    clear: function() {
      store = {};
    }
  };
})();

Object.defineProperty(window, 'localStorage', { 
  value: mock,
});
share|improve this answer

Are there any libraries out there to mock localStorage?

I just wrote one:

(function () {
    var localStorage = {};
    localStorage.setItem = function (key, val) {
         this[key] = val + '';
    }
    localStorage.getItem = function (key) {
        return this[key];
    }
    Object.defineProperty(localStorage, 'length', {
        get: function () { return Object.keys(this).length - 2; }
    });

    // Your tests here

})();

My initial testing shows that localStorage refuses to be assignable in firefox

Only in global context. With a wrapper function as above, it works just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
What if code uses window.localStorage? – Anthony Sottile Jul 15 '12 at 1:48
    
you can also use var window = { localStorage: ... } – user123444555621 Jul 15 '12 at 5:45
1  
Unfortunately that means I would need to know every property I'll need and have added to the window object (and I miss out on its prototype, etc.). Including whatever jQuery may need. Unfortunately this seems like a non-solution. Oh also, the tests are testing code that uses localStorage, the tests don't necessarily have localStorage directly in them. This solution does not change the localStorage for other scripts so it is a non-solution. +1 for the scoping trick though – Anthony Sottile Jul 15 '12 at 14:14
    
You may need to adapt your code in order to make it testable. I know this is very annoying, and that's why I prefer heavy selenium testing over unit tests. – user123444555621 Jul 15 '12 at 17:19
    
This is not a valid solution. If you call any function from within that anonymous function, you will lose the reference to the mock window or mock localStorage object. The purpose of a unit test is that you DO call an outside function. So when you call your function that works with localStorage, it won't use the mock. Instead, you have to wrap the code you are testing in an anonymous function. To make it testable, have it accept the window object as a parameter. – John Kurlak Mar 6 '13 at 21:26

I decided to reiterate my comment to Pumbaa80's answer as separate answer so that it'll be easier to reuse it as a library.

I took Pumbaa80's code, refined it a bit, added tests and published it as an npm module here: https://www.npmjs.com/package/mock-local-storage.

Here is a source code: https://github.com/letsrock-today/mock-local-storage/blob/master/src/mock-localstorage.js

Some tests: https://github.com/letsrock-today/mock-local-storage/blob/master/test/mock-localstorage.js

Module creates mock localStorage and sessionStorage on the global object (window or global, which of them is defined).

In my other project's tests I required it with mocha as this: mocha -r mock-local-storage to make global definitions available for all code under test.

Basically, code looks like follows:

(function (glob) {

    function createStorage() {
        let s = {},
            noopCallback = () => {},
            _itemInsertionCallback = noopCallback;

        Object.defineProperty(s, 'setItem', {
            get: () => {
                return (k, v) => {
                    k = k + '';
                    _itemInsertionCallback(s.length);
                    s[k] = v + '';
                };
            }
        });
        Object.defineProperty(s, 'getItem', {
            // ...
        });
        Object.defineProperty(s, 'removeItem', {
            // ...
        });
        Object.defineProperty(s, 'clear', {
            // ...
        });
        Object.defineProperty(s, 'length', {
            get: () => {
                return Object.keys(s).length;
            }
        });
        Object.defineProperty(s, "key", {
            // ...
        });
        Object.defineProperty(s, 'itemInsertionCallback', {
            get: () => {
                return _itemInsertionCallback;
            },
            set: v => {
                if (!v || typeof v != 'function') {
                    v = noopCallback;
                }
                _itemInsertionCallback = v;
            }
        });
        return s;
    }

    glob.localStorage = createStorage();
    glob.sessionStorage = createStorage();
}(typeof window !== 'undefined' ? window : global));

Note that all methods added via Object.defineProperty so that them won't be iterated, accessed or removed as regular items and won't count in length. Also I added a way to register callback which is called when an item is about to be put into object. This callback may be used to emulate quota exceeded error in tests.

share|improve this answer

Unfortunately, the only way we can mock the localStorage object in a test scenario is to change the code we're testing. You have to wrap your code in an anonymous function (which you should be doing anyway) and use "dependency injection" to pass in a reference to the window object. Something like:

(function (window) {
   // Your code
}(window.mockWindow || window));

Then, inside of your test, you can specify:

window.mockWindow = { localStorage: { ... } };
share|improve this answer

Here is an exemple using sinon spy and mock:

// window.localStorage.setItem
var spy = sinon.spy(window.localStorage, "setItem");

// You can use this in your assertions
spy.calledWith(aKey, aValue)

// Reset localStorage.setItem method    
spy.reset();



// window.localStorage.getItem
var stub = sinon.stub(window.localStorage, "getItem");
stub.returns(aValue);

// You can use this in your assertions
stub.calledWith(aKey)

// Reset localStorage.getItem method
stub.reset();
share|improve this answer

I put my TypeScript implementation for Jasmine (with angular) tests here:

https://gist.github.com/wzr1337/b3fe4abcc46588aa8fcb

share|improve this answer

Overwriting the localStorage property of the global window object as suggested in some of the answers won't work in most JS engines, because they declare the localStorage data property as not writable and not configurable.

However I found out that at least with PhantomJS's (version 1.9.8) WebKit version you could use the legacy API __defineGetter__ to control what happens if localStorage is accessed. Still it would be interesting if this works in other browsers as well.

var tmpStorage = window.localStorage;

// replace local storage
window.__defineGetter__('localStorage', function () {
    throw new Error("localStorage not available");
    // you could also return some other object here as a mock
});

// do your tests here    

// restore old getter to actual local storage
window.__defineGetter__('localStorage',
                        function () { return tmpStorage });

The benefit of this approach is that you would not have to modify the code you're about to test.

share|improve this answer
    
Just noticed that this won't work in PhantomJS 2.1.1. ;) – Conrad Calmez Feb 12 at 15:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.