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I want to create a dictionary that stores the name of a mathematical function, the input (a single number) and the result.

The structure should be something like cache = {procedure: {input:result}}

i.e.

cache = {'factorial': {4:24, 10:3628800, 20:2432902008176640000},
         'square': {2:4, 5:25, 10:100}
         'sum': {3:6, 5:10, 7:14}}

def factorial(n):
    #print "Running factorial"
    result = 1
    for i in range(2, n + 1):
        result = result * i
    return result

def square(n):
    result = n ^ 2
    return result

def sum(n):
    result = n * 2
    return result

I don't want the cache dictionary to be pre-created in the sense that it may not know which mathematical functions it will store values for. I want to then create a function, named cached_execution, that will first check the cache if the function has been called for the input and if so return what is stored as the value for the input:result pair.

If not then compute the operation, store it in cache and return the value. If the function exists in the cache then another key/value pair should be created under it. If not then create a new entry for the function name and store the key/value of the input/result under it.

The structure of cached_execution is simple but what I can't figure out is how to append to a dictionary. It seems append is not a method that is allowed for a dictionary structure. I have tried various things without success.

Appreciate the help.

share|improve this question
1  
Side note: n^2 doesn't give you the square, but n XOR 2. You want n**2. –  DSM Jul 14 '12 at 16:58
    
What have you tried? Can you edit to add your code and point out where the problem is? –  David Alber Jul 14 '12 at 17:08
    
"...what I can't figure out is how to append to a dictionary. It seems append is not a method that is allowed for a dictionary structure." You do not append to a dictionary, you set key:value pairs. If you have a dictionary d and want to set the pair 4:24, you do d[4] = 24. –  David Alber Jul 14 '12 at 17:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You might also want to look at Memoize. There are a number of possible implementations, 3 of which are on the Python.org wiki. Even if you write your own version, it is helpful to see how others have attacked the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for steering me to that document. It is exactly what I need. –  codingknob Jul 15 '12 at 14:02
import pprint

class MathFunctions(object)

    def __init__(self):
        self.cache = {}

    def print_cache(self):
        pprint.pprint(self.cache)

    def factorial(self, n):
        #print "Running factorial"
        result = 1
        for i in range(2, n + 1):
            result = result * i
        return result

    def square(self, n):
        result = n ^ 2
        return result

    def sum(self,n):
        result = n * 2
        return result

    def unknown(self,*args, **kwargs):
        return "UNKNOWN"

if __name__ == "__main__":

    m = MathFunctions()

    functions_to_run = [ 'sum', 'square', 'etc' ]
    input_values     = [ 1, 3.3, 9 ]

    for function in functions_to_run:
        for input in input_values:
            result = m.cache.get(function,{}).get(input,None)

            if None == result:
                if None == m.cache.get(function,None):
                    m.cache[function] = {}
                m.cache[function][input] = getattr(m,function,m.unknown)(input)
share|improve this answer

Here is a class based approach:

def factorial(x):
    result = 1
    for i in range(2, x+1):
        result *= i
    return result


def square(x):
    return x**2


class CachedMath:
    def __init__(self):
        """create a cached result of function return values so that
        if the same function is called with the same argument more
        than once, the operation is not repeated

        """
        self.cache = {}

    def execute(self, func, number):
        if func not in self.cache:
            #if the function has never been used before
            #create a spot in the cache for it
            self.cache[func] = {}

        if number in self.cache[func]:
            #if this operation has been done before
            #return the cached result
            return self.cache[func][number]
        else:
            #otherwise perform the operation and store the result in cache
            result = func(number)
            self.cache[func][number] = result
            return result

ops = CachedMath()
print ops.execute(factorial, 10)
print ops.execute(factorial, 10)
print ops.execute(square, 9)

you can add new caches for new functions just by using the execute method.

If you don't want to use a class, then this also seems to work for me:

def factorial(x):
    result = 1
    for i in range(2, x+1):
        result *= i
    return result

cache = {}
cache[factorial] = {2: 2, 4: 24, 10:362880}
def do_math(func, number):
    if number in cache[func]:
        return cache[func][number]
    else:
        result = func(number)
        cache[func][number] = result
        return result

print do_math(factorial, 10)
print do_math(factorial, 5)
share|improve this answer

Here's a simple decorator version of what you want to do.

def cached_execution(cache):
    def cached_exec_decorator(func):
        def check_cache(x):
            try:
                result = cache[func.__name__][x]
            except KeyError:
                result = func(x)
                if func.__name__ not in cache:
                    cache[func.__name__] = {x : result}
                else:
                    cache[func.__name__][x] = result
            return result
        return check_cache
    return cached_exec_decorator

Example usage:

cache = dict()

# decorator for caching the function call
# you have to pass it a dict to cache in
@cached_execution(cache)
def square(x):
    print "Square is being evaluated!"
    return n ** 2

print square(5) # "Square is being evaluated!\n25" - square(5) isn't cached
print square(5) # "25" - square(5) is cached
print cache # {'square': {5: 25}}

This method is semantically a bit nicer than the method you initially described and some of the other answers posted as I was writing this—it hides away the caching mechanism, so you can just call square(x) instead of remembering to call cached_execution(square, x).

You could probably also do this as a callable class decorator that would store its own cache, rather than needing to provide a reference to an external cache dict. I think this is the method used by the memoize code snippet that @Peter Rowell linked—I didn't know about that page or the name until now.

share|improve this answer

check this out!!!

cache={}

def factorial(n):
    result=1
    for i in range(2, n+1):
        result+=1
    return result

def square(n):
    return n^2

def sum(n):
    return n*2


def cached_execution(function,n):
    if function in cache.keys():    
        if n in cache[function].keys():
            return cache[function][n]
        else:
            if function=='factorial':
                cache['factorial'][n]=factorial(n)
                return cache['factorial'][n] 
            elif function=='square':
                cache['square'][n]=square(n)
                return cache['square'][n]
            elif function=='sum':
                cache['sum'][n]=sum(n)
                return cache['sum'][n]
    else:
        cache[function]={}
        if function=='factorial':
            cache['factorial']={}
            cache['factorial'][n]=factorial(n)
            return cache['factorial'][n] 
        elif function=='square':
            cache['square']={}
            cache['square'][n]=square(n)
            return cache['square'][n]
        elif function=='sum':
            cache['sum']={}
            cache['sum'][n]=sum(n)
            return cache['sum'][n]
        else:
            cache[function]={}      
            cache[function][n]="Define_function"
            return cache[function][n]


cached_execution('sum',8)
cached_execution('square',7)
cached_execution('sum',5)
cached_execution('factorial',10)
cached_execution('log',10)
print cache

it gives output as: {'factorial': {10: 10}, 'sum': {8: 16, 5: 10}, 'square': {7: 5}, 'log': {10: 'Define_function'}

share|improve this answer
    
You edited your post and fixed one problem, but it still doesn't return the result if it isn't yet cached, just calculates and adds it for next time –  Gareth Webber Jul 14 '12 at 17:31
    
now... just defining cache as a blank dict will work!! –  namit Jul 14 '12 at 17:42

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