Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an element that is shown or hidden depending on some condition. I use jQuery fadeIn() and fadeOut() animations to hide or show the element.

My problem is that the positioning of that element is suddenly changed after a fadeOut/fadeIn sequence. However I cannot find any difference in the computed style rules. Neither for the element itself nor for the embedding div tag. What is changed after the sequence ?

I made a short test case: http://jsfiddle.net/2QVX8/14/

Note the triangle below the table pointing down, it is centered. When you click the "toggle" button twice the fadeOut/fadeIn sequence is run. Afterwards the element is not centered any more but positioned hard left.

Here is the code of the test case:

HTML:

<button id='toggle'>Toggle</button>
<p/>
<div>
      <table id="list">
        <tbody>
            <tr><td>1-1</td><td>1-2</td></tr>
            <tr><td>2-1</td><td>2-2</td></tr>
            <tr><td>3-1</td><td>3-2</td></tr>
        </tbody>
      </table>
      <div id="footer">
          <span>&#9662;</span>
      </div>
</div>
​

CSS:

table{
  width: 100%;
  border: 1px solid black;   
}
table tr td{
  text-align: center;  
}
#footer{
  position: absolute;
}

​JS/jQuery:

$('#toggle').bind('click',function(){
    if ($('#footer span').is(':visible'))
       $('#footer span').fadeOut('fast');   
  else $('#footer span').fadeIn('fast');   
})
share|improve this question
    
WHAT is: <p> without a closure! and what is: </tr></tr> ? –  Roko C. Buljan Jul 14 '12 at 17:32
    
Sorry, my fault, too much in a hurry. I corrected those glitches, they have nothing to do with the original problem. Thanks ! –  arkascha Jul 14 '12 at 17:37
    
No problem. I fixed your issue with just a bit of CSS take a look. –  Roko C. Buljan Jul 14 '12 at 17:41
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't quite understand why, but an absolute position without coordinates will make it unstable. Try this: http://jsfiddle.net/tovic/2QVX8/15/

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, just realized that too. See my own Answer to this issue: I removed the absolute positioning and all is fine. –  arkascha Jul 14 '12 at 17:52
    
Although all other answers solve the problem as well I accept this answer because it is the only one that actually explains why the absolute positioning is a problem. Thanks ! –  arkascha Jul 14 '12 at 18:01
    
you're welcome :) –  Taufik Nurrohman Jul 14 '12 at 18:09
add comment

You should use:

#footer span{
     position: relative;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You suppress the effect in the test case. This is a workaround that changes the layout to get the desired effect in this test case. Works here, but is no general solution or answer to the question. The test case is a simplified version of my real world problem. In there I have an img tag, not a span. I cannot set an img to width:100%;. I used a span tag in the test case to keep things simple. Too simple maybe, sorry for that. The question still is: where is the difference between before and after the sequence has run ? –  arkascha Jul 14 '12 at 17:44
    
@arkascha Reedited my answer. Sorry for not interpreting well your thoughts. –  Roko C. Buljan Jul 14 '12 at 17:47
    
The difference is that your element is opened at the beginning, and due to text-align the children is being floated center. But once the element faded out you loose the text-alignment cause there's no room for elements that have no relative position (relative to parent) set, or at least a width 100% that will maintain it's size inside the faded parent. –  Roko C. Buljan Jul 14 '12 at 17:51
    
we thought into the same direction: in the Answer I gave myself inbetween I also removed the absolute positioning. That works. Thanks ! –  arkascha Jul 14 '12 at 17:53
add comment

Ok, this is probably the most simple solution:

I remove the absolute css positioning rule for the footer:

position:absolute; 

See the fidler, unchanged apart from that change:

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this : http://jsfiddle.net/2QVX8/18/

HTML :

<button id='toggle'>Toggle</button>
<p>
<div>
      <table id="list">
        <tbody>
            <tr><td>1-1</td><td>1-2</tr></tr>
            <tr><td>2-1</td><td>2-2</tr></tr>
            <tr><td>3-1</td><td>3-2</tr></tr>
        </tbody>
      </table>
      <div id="footer">
          <div class="arrow">&#9662;</div>
      </div>
</div>

CSS:

table{
  width: 100%;
  border: 1px solid black;   
}
table tr td{
  text-align: center;  
}

#footer{
  display: block;
  width: 100%;
  height: 1em;
  text-align: center;
  padding: 3px;
}

JQUERY:

$('#toggle').bind('click',function(){
    if ($('#footer .arrow').is(':visible'))
       $('#footer .arrow').fadeOut('fast');   
  else $('#footer .arrow').fadeIn('fast');   
})
share|improve this answer
    
You fade the container instead of the element. I do not want to do this, because this has other layout issues apart from this question. I need to keep the container. Sorry. –  arkascha Jul 14 '12 at 17:35
    
yeah just edited my answer..this should work i guess. –  AdityaSaxena Jul 14 '12 at 17:36
    
Hm, am I missing something ? The only change I can spot is that you use a class instead of an id selector. But why does it work then ? What is the difference behind it ? I would expect the same modifications to be applied, since the selectors produce the same set of elements. –  arkascha Jul 14 '12 at 17:47
    
Ah, now I just see that you also removed the absolute positioning from the span. This is the solutions we others also came to. Using a class selector instead of an id selector has nothing to do with the solution . Thanks anyway. –  arkascha Jul 14 '12 at 17:58
    
@arkascha you're welcome! –  AdityaSaxena Jul 15 '12 at 15:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.