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Inspired by this question about Python caching small integers.

Is it possible for the Python compiler to replace (0 - 6) with -6 at compile time? The code below suggests that it does not. If it is not possible, why not? I don't think that the meaning of 0, -, or 6 can be different at run time.

If this is possible, why does CPython not do it?

# test_integers.py
def test_integers():
    print "-6 is -6 ?", -6 is -6 # True
    print "(0 - 6) is -6 ?", (0 - 6) is -6 # False

# import_test_integers.py
import test_integers
test_integers.test_integers()

My Python details in case this is very implementation-dependent:

Python 2.6.5 (r265:79063, Apr 16 2010, 13:09:56) 
[GCC 4.4.3] on linux2
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2  
FWIW: this type of optimization is known as "constant folding". (I have no idea whether or not CPython does it.) –  Laurence Gonsalves Jul 14 '12 at 17:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

First, you shouldn't be using is to compare integer values to detect optimizations. That has nothing to do with anything, as explained in the question you linked. If you want to know what optimizations were performed on your function, use the dis module, which produces (in 2.7.2, after fixing your -1 typo):

>>> import dis
>>> 
>>> def test_integers():
...     print "-6 is -6 ?", -6 is -6 # True
...     print "(0-6) is -6 ?", (0 - 6) is -6 # False
... 
>>> dis.dis(test_integers)
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               1 ('-6 is -6 ?')
              3 PRINT_ITEM          
              4 LOAD_CONST               2 (-6)
              7 LOAD_CONST               2 (-6)
             10 COMPARE_OP               8 (is)
             13 PRINT_ITEM          
             14 PRINT_NEWLINE       

  3          15 LOAD_CONST               3 ('(0-6) is -6 ?')
             18 PRINT_ITEM          
             19 LOAD_CONST               6 (-6)
             22 LOAD_CONST               2 (-6)
             25 COMPARE_OP               8 (is)
             28 PRINT_ITEM          
             29 PRINT_NEWLINE       
             30 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             33 RETURN_VALUE        

and you see that the subtraction actually was optimized away. You can see some others, too:

>>> def f():
...     x = 1+2
...     x = 2-3
...     x = 3*4
...     x = 4/5
...     x = 5**6
... 
>>> dis.dis(f)
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               7 (3)
              3 STORE_FAST               0 (x)

  3           6 LOAD_CONST               8 (-1)
              9 STORE_FAST               0 (x)

  4          12 LOAD_CONST               9 (12)
             15 STORE_FAST               0 (x)

  5          18 LOAD_CONST               4 (4)
             21 LOAD_CONST               5 (5)
             24 BINARY_DIVIDE       
             25 STORE_FAST               0 (x)

  6          28 LOAD_CONST              10 (15625)
             31 STORE_FAST               0 (x)
             34 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             37 RETURN_VALUE        
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Arg. I was just about to post something to this effect. Nice answer. +1 –  mgilson Jul 14 '12 at 17:43
    
corrected the typo, thanks. still digesting the rest of your answer –  RoundTower Jul 14 '12 at 17:44
    
this answers my question perfectly but I'm now even more confused about how LOAD_CONST and co_consts work. will post a followup question if I can't find out or figure out the answer. –  RoundTower Jul 14 '12 at 18:02
    
@RoundTower: yep, that'd be a separate question. If this answer was helpful you can accept it, and the usual crew can address questions about how the Python VM works elsewhere. –  DSM Jul 14 '12 at 18:04
    
yes I expect I will accept it - just holding off in case anyone posts an even better answer. –  RoundTower Jul 14 '12 at 18:05

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