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I am trying to add a save method to a List that I can call and serialize the object to a file. I've got everything figured out except how to get the base class itself.

Here's my code:

/// <summary>
/// Inherits the List class and adds a save method that writes the list to a stream.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
class fileList<T> : List<T>
{
    private static IFormatter serial = new BinaryFormatter();
    private Stream dataStream;

    /// <summary>
    /// path of the data file.
    /// </summary>
    public string dataFile { get; set; }
    /// <summary>
    /// Sets the datafile path
    /// </summary>
    public fileList(string dataFile)
    {
        this.dataFile = dataFile;
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// Saves the list to the filestream.
    /// </summary>
    public void Save()
    {
        dataStream = new FileStream(dataFile,
            FileMode.Truncate, FileAccess.Write,
            FileShare.Read);
        //Right here is my problem. How do I access the base class instance.
        serial.Serialize(dataStream, this.base); 
        dataStream.Flush();
        dataStream.Close();
        dataStream = null;
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The line

serial.Serialize(dataStream, this.base); 

should just be

serial.Serialize(dataStream, this); 

Note however (thanks @Anders) that this will also serialize string dataFile. To avoid that, decorate that property with NonSerializedAttribute.

Having said that, I prefer to implement this type of functionality as a static method. With the advent of extension methods, I created a small extension class to handle this for any serializable type:

static public class SerialHelperExtensions
{
    static public void Serialize<T>(this T obj, string path)
    {
        SerializationHelper.Serialize<T>(obj, path);
    }
}

static public class SerializationHelper
{
    static public void Serialize<T>(T obj, string path)
    {

        DataContractSerializer s = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(T));
        using (FileStream fs = File.Open(path, FileMode.Create))
        {
            s.WriteObject(fs, obj);
        }
    }

    static public T Deserialize<T>(string path)
    {
        DataContractSerializer s = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(T));
        using (FileStream fs = File.Open(path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
        {
            object s2 = s.ReadObject(fs);
            return (T)s2;
        }
    }
}

You can certainly substitute BinaryFormatter for DataContractSerializer and use the same pattern.

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1  
Why is the cast ((List<T>)) needed? –  Anders Abel Jul 14 '12 at 18:03
    
string dataFile will be serialized if the instance is treated as fileList<T>, which is probably not intended. –  Eric J. Jul 14 '12 at 18:05
1  
The cast won't help for that, the signature is Serialize(Stream, Object) so it won't use the static type (that would require generics). Instead I think that a NonSerialized attribute is needed on the string dataFile field. –  Anders Abel Jul 14 '12 at 18:09
    
D'oh. You're right. Updating my answer accordingly. –  Eric J. Jul 14 '12 at 18:14
1  
DataContractSerializer produces XML which is larger –  Eric J. Jul 14 '12 at 22:18

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