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Well, I need to return a pointer to an instance of a class that will be created inside a function. Is this appropriate?

this is example code:

template <typename T>
ImplicatedMembershipFunction<T>* 
TriangularMF<T>::minImplicate(const T &constantSet) const
{
    static ImplicatedType* resultingSet = new ImplicatedType();
    // do something to generate resultingSet...
    return resultingSet;
}

I want to return pointers, because need to have subclasses of a base class in a container. In the above code ImplicatedType is a class defined in TriangularMF<T> and derived from ImplicatedMembershipFunction<T>. There will be various template classes like TriangularMF that the have a nested class derived from ImplicatedMembershipFunction<T>, I need to treat with them in same way. For example, outside the library, I may want to do something like :

TriangularMF<double> trmf(0,1,2);
TrapesoidalMF<double> trpmf(0,1,3,2); // a class like TriangularMF but
                                      // ImplicatedType is different 
ImplicatedMembershipFunction<double>* itrmf = trmf.implicate(0.6);
ImplicatedMembershipFunction<double>* itrpmf = trpmf.implicate(0.6); // same as above.

// use them in the same way:
vector<ImplicatedMembershipFunction<double>*> vec;
vec.push_back(itrmf); 
vec.push_back(itrpmf);

The reason that I don't want to use C++11 features like move semantics or std::shared_ptr is that I don't like to force my teammates to install newer versions of g++ on their computers. I can't give them a compiled version of the library, because it's heavily templated.

EDIT The library is going to be threaded. Especially, the TriangularMF<T>::minImplicate will run in multiple threads at same time. So, making the minImplicate a mutal task, makes no sense for the performance.

share|improve this question
3  
The versions of GCC that support C++11 go pretty far back. If their version doesn't support it, they should be upgrading anyway. –  chris Jul 14 '12 at 19:20
    
I believe static ImplicatedType* resultingSet = new ImplicatedType(); will result in a memory leak, as you allocate a fresh instance with each call, presumably losing track of the last one. –  Chowlett Jul 14 '12 at 19:22
1  
@Chowlett it won't, it's only called once per specialization. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 14 '12 at 19:23
1  
It's safe and legal and well-defined and not entirely evil; what do you mean by appropriate? –  Alan Stokes Jul 14 '12 at 19:26
1  
@sorush-r, Maybe it's all about pointing it out and explaining the advantages. This distribution makes it extremely easy and works great. –  chris Jul 14 '12 at 19:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Returning a pointer is not itself the issue, but you have to define a clean "policy" about whoi creates and who destroy.

In your code, you define a static pointer that is initialized with a new object the very first time its (pointer) definition is encountered.

The pointer itself will be destroyed just after main() will return, but what about the object it points to? If you let something else to take care of the deletion, your function will continue to return that pointer even if the object is no more there. If you let it there, it will be killed out at the end of the program (not a "dangerous" leak, since it is just one object, but what about if its destructor has to take some sensible actions?)

You have most likely to declare, not a static pointer, but a static OBJECT, and return ... its address or its reference.

In that way the object is granted to exist up to program termination and to be properly destroyed after main() returns.

template <typename T>
ImplicatedMembershipFunction<T>* 
TriangularMF<T>::minImplicate(const T &constantSet) const
{
    static ImplicatedType resultingSet(....);
    return &resultingSet;
} 

Note that I eliminated your "do something to ..." since it will be executed every time (not just the very first) To initialize ImplicatedType, you had better to rely on the constructor. Or, if you cannot construct it in one shot, do something like

template <typename T>
ImplicatedMembershipFunction<T>* 
TriangularMF<T>::minImplicate(const T &constantSet) const
{
    static ImplicatedType* resultingSet=0;
    static bool init=true;
    if(init)
    {
        init=false; 
        static ImplicatedType result;
        resultingSet=&result;
        // do something to generate resultingSet...
    }
    return resultingSet;
}

If you are in a multithreading situation, you also need a static mutex an lock it before if(init), unlocking at return.

share|improve this answer
    
I can write a structor for ImplicatedType that makes it at one shot. I'm worried about multi-threading. If I have to wrap the code in a mutex lock/unlock, threading will make my code extremely slower than non-threaded code. I'm supposed to write a library for an ARM Cortex 2 core processor, and don't want to ignore benefits of threading (if possible) –  sorush-r Jul 14 '12 at 20:07
    
The lock in the uncontended case is an atomic increment and fetch which is not slow. It would be difficult to contrive a case where the performance difference is significant. –  Andrew Tomazos Jul 14 '12 at 20:10
    
@sorush-r: That's a "false problem": if the compiler adhere to the new standard, it locks before initialize a static. So if you lock again inside, no "performance penalty" will be added. (it happens only once) If the compiler doesn't, you HAVE-TO lock, and obtain the same performance as above. –  Emilio Garavaglia Jul 14 '12 at 20:13
    
@AndrewTomazos-Fathomling that's not the point I mentioned. The code is going to generate a separate thread for each Rule<T,N,X>. (The Rule is not important here) for a simple FIS, there will be say 12 threads. each thread have to implicate say 4 membership functions. If implication is a mutal process, context switching time + implication time will exceed the time needed to linearly implicate all rules. –  sorush-r Jul 14 '12 at 20:18

This is a commonly used idiom for singletons:

class CMyClass {};

CMyClass& MyClass() {
  static CMyClass mclass;
  return mclass;
}

CMyClass will be constructed on first MyClass() function call.

it looks quite like your code, with the exception for pointer which will cause problems with destroying such crated instance. If you dont want to use shared_ptr here, then consider writing your own shared_ptr like template, then it should work fine.

[edit] if this code is going to be used in multithreaded environment, then using smart pointer here will be tricky

share|improve this answer
    
It will be used in many pthreads. I can't see why this solution is problematic! –  sorush-r Jul 14 '12 at 19:46
3  
Before C++11 the language makes no guarantee that the "initialise if not yet initialised" logic is thread safe. –  Alan Stokes Jul 14 '12 at 19:51
2  
Although it has only recently become required by the standard, in practice automatic locking of local static variable initialization has been implemented for many, many years. All of the commonly used compilers (even old versions) do it. –  Andrew Tomazos Jul 14 '12 at 19:55
1  
    
@AndrewTomazos-Fathomling: Good point. Many times we "defend" ourselves from something we are already defended by. –  Emilio Garavaglia Jul 14 '12 at 20:15

You can use this technique, but return a reference. The caller can take the address of the result if they need a pointer to store.

template <typename T>
ImplicatedMembershipFunction<T> &
TriangularMF<T>::minImplicate(const T &constantSet) const
{
    static ImplicatedType* resultingSet = new ImplicatedType();
    // do something to generate resultingSet...
    return *resultingSet;
}

But, the danger of the code is that it is not inherently MT-safe. But if you know the code inside minImplicate is thread safe, or your code is single threaded, there are no issues.

share|improve this answer
    
Who destroys the new object? –  Emilio Garavaglia Jul 14 '12 at 19:51
    
@EmilioGaravaglia: In this case, no one. The memory is reaped when the program ends. –  jxh Jul 14 '12 at 20:15
    
That's the point: the memory is reaped, but the object destructor is not called. Suppose it has to flush something ... –  Emilio Garavaglia Jul 14 '12 at 20:48
    
@EmilioGaravaglia: That's only important if the destructors have something to do. I +1'd your post already for making this point. But, making sure destructors get called at shutdown is really not that important if the they don't do anything useful, and is just more code to debug if static object instances are interdependent. –  jxh Jul 14 '12 at 21:57

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