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I have three layers of classes, for instance BaseSpreading (base class), IterativeMapSpreading (one of the subclasses of BaseSpreading) and TentSpreading, BernoulliSpreading (two of the subclasses of IterativeMapSpreading). A method called generateSpreading appears in all classes. A user-defined option specifies the spreading, for instance "tent" or "bernoulli". Then an if-else control structure invokes the generateSpreading method of the appropriate subclass ("tent" and "bernoulli" would call the generateSpreading method of the TentSpreading and BernoulliSpreading subclasses respectively).

I know how to solve my problem by declaring generateSpreading as virtual and to define a base class pointer (to BaseSpreading). Then, the derived class object can be instantiated inside the if-else control structure according to the user option. Despite the fact that such instance is not available outside the scope of the control structure, it is possible to point the base class pointer to the derived class object using a factory pattern, see for instance this post. Although the solution based on virtual methods works, it is not useful for my purposes due to its bad performance. My simulation calls the virtual function millions of times.

As an alternative approach, I used template programming. In this case, I have to deal with the problem that the instance of the nested template class is not available outside the scope of the if-else structure. My question is whether it is possible to extend the factory pattern idea when working with template classes. To make this work, in case it is possible, I would have to create a pointer to the template base class and then point it to the instantiated template subclass, which is defined inside the if-else structure. The problem then boils down to defining a default template argument for the template base class, and this has been my difficulty. This link gives an example of how to define a default template argument which is not a well-known type such as "int" (the default argument of the link's example is the standard "allocator" template for vectors).

These are my scripts:

base_spreading.h:

#ifndef BASE_SPREADING_H_
#define BASE_SPREADING_H_

#include <boost/filesystem.hpp>
#include <boost/filesystem/fstream.hpp>
#include <boost/numeric/ublas/vector.hpp>

template <class S>
class BaseSpreading
{
  public:
    BaseSpreading(S& spreading);

    void generateSpreading(boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double>&);
  private:
    S& spreading_;
};

template <class S>
BaseSpreading<S>::BaseSpreading(S& spreading) : spreading_(spreading) {}

template <class S>
void BaseSpreading<S>::generateSpreading(
  boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double>& spr) {
  spreading_.generateSpreading(spr);
}

#endif /* BASE_SPREADING_H_ */

spreading_iterative_map.h

#ifndef SPREADING_ITERATIVE_MAP_H_
#define SPREADING_ITERATIVE_MAP_H_

#include <boost/numeric/ublas/vector.hpp>

template <class S>
class IterativeMapSpreading
{
  public:
    IterativeMapSpreading(S& spreading);

    double evaluateMap(double);
    void generateSpreading(boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double>&);
    double sampleInitialPoint();
  private:
    S& spreading_;

    void calculateFollowingPoints(boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double>&);
};

template <class S>
IterativeMapSpreading<S>::IterativeMapSpreading(S& spreading) :
  spreading_(spreading) {}

template <class S>
void IterativeMapSpreading<S>::calculateFollowingPoints(
  boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double>& spr) {
    for (unsigned int i=1; i<spr.size(); ++i) {
      spr(i) = spreading_.evaluateMap(spr(i-1));
    }
}

template <class S>
double IterativeMapSpreading<S>::evaluateMap(double x) {
  return spreading_.evaluateMap(x);
}

template <class S>
void IterativeMapSpreading<S>::generateSpreading(
  boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double>& spr) {
  spr(0) = spreading_.sampleInitialPoint();
  calculateFollowingPoints(spr);
}

template <class S>
double IterativeMapSpreading<S>::sampleInitialPoint() {
  return spreading_.sampleInitialPoint();
}

#endif /* SPREADING_ITERATIVE_MAP_H_ */

spreading_tent.h:

#ifndef SPREADING_TENT_H_
#define SPREADING_TENT_H_

#include <math.h>

#include "random_number_generation.h"

class TentSpreading
{
  public:
    TentSpreading(double uniformMin=0, double uniformMax=1,
      double nonCentrality=0.5);

    double evaluateMap(double);
    double sampleInitialPoint();
  private:
    const double uniformMin_, uniformMax_, nonCentrality_;
    double leftIntercept_, leftSlope_, rightIntercept_, rightSlope_;
    boost::random::uniform_real_distribution<> Uniform;

    void setLines();
    void validateParameters() const;
};

#endif /* SPREADING_TENT_H_ */

spreading_tent.cpp:

#include "spreading_tent.h"

TentSpreading::TentSpreading(double uniformMin, double uniformMax,
  double nonCentrality) : uniformMin_(uniformMin), uniformMax_(uniformMax),
  nonCentrality_(nonCentrality), Uniform(uniformMin, uniformMax) {
  setLines();
}

double TentSpreading::evaluateMap(double x) {
  double y;

  if((uniformMin_<=x) && (x<nonCentrality_))
    y = leftSlope_*x+leftIntercept_;
  else if((nonCentrality_<=x) && (x<=uniformMax_))
    y = rightSlope_*x+rightIntercept_;

  return y;
}

double TentSpreading::sampleInitialPoint() {
  return Uniform(rng);
}

void TentSpreading::setLines() {
  leftSlope_ = (uniformMax_-uniformMin_)/(nonCentrality_-uniformMin_);
  leftIntercept_ = -uniformMin_*(uniformMax_-nonCentrality_)/
    (nonCentrality_-uniformMin_);
  rightSlope_ = -(uniformMax_-uniformMin_)/(uniformMax_-nonCentrality_);
  rightIntercept_ = (pow(uniformMax_, 2)-uniformMin_*nonCentrality_)/
    (uniformMax_-nonCentrality_);
}

Finally, the part of main.cpp that is of interest:

  try  {
    if (sbcOptions.mode=="sim-spr") {
      boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double> sprVector(3);

      if (sbcOptions.spr=="tent") {
        TentSpreading tent(-1, 1, 0);
        IterativeMapSpreading<TentSpreading> map(tent);
        BaseSpreading<IterativeMapSpreading<TentSpreading> > spreading(map);
      }

      spreading.generateSpreading(sprVector);
    }
  }
  catch(std::logic_error& logicError) {
    logTee << logicError.what() << "\n";
    return 1;
  }

To use the factory pattern, I tried adding an abstract base class, called FactoryBaseSpreading, of which BaseSpreading was a subclass. This was the definition of FactoryBaseSpreading:

FactoryBaseSpreading {
  public:
    static BaseSpreading* create(std::string type);
}

FactoryBaseSpreading* FactoryBaseSpreading::create(std::string type) {
  if (type == "tent") {
    TentSpreading tent(-1, 1, 0);
    IterativeMapSpreading<TentSpreading> map(tent);
    return new BaseSpreading<IterativeMapSpreading<TentSpreading> >(map);
  }
  return NULL;
}

//Also, change the following line in base_spreading.h:
class BaseSpreading : public FactoryBaseSpreading

This way, I can then define in "main.cpp" a pointer to FactoryBaseSpreading and point it to the appropriate subclass inside the if-else structure, for example:

FactoryBaseSpreading* spreading;

try  {
  if (sbcOptions.mode=="sim-spr") {
    boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double> sprVector(3);

    if (sbcOptions.spr=="tent") {
      spreading = FactoryBaseSpreading::create("tent");
    }

    spreading.generateSpreading(sprVector);
  }
}
catch(std::logic_error& logicError) {
  logTee << logicError.what() << "\n";
  return 1;
}

This compiles and runs ok, provided that I define a virtual generateSpreading method in FactoryBaseSpreading. However, what I was trying to avoid was the use of virtual functions, so the factory patter doesn't solve my problem.

So, I then thought of defining the "create" method in the BaseSpreading base class, without creating the FactoryBaseSpreading abstract base class. In this case the definition of the "create" method becomes:

template <class S>
BaseSpreading<S>* BaseSpreading<S>::create(std::string type) {
  if (type == "tent") {
    TentSpreading tent(-1, 1, 0);
    IterativeMapSpreading<TentSpreading> map(tent);
    return new BaseSpreading<IterativeMapSpreading<TentSpreading> >(map);
  }
  return NULL;
}

The problem with this code is that I can't define the base class pointer anymore, since it depends on the template argument S. For instance, this is not valid:

BaseSpreading<S>* spreading;

That's why I am asking if I can provide a default argument in the definition of BaseSpreading. Even if I were able to specify a default template argument, I would not be able to switch template arguments at runtime, since templates are instantiated by the compiler at compile-time, as explained here. So, it seems that I can not avoid using virtual functions, not even with the help of template metaprogramming. The only other way I can think of tackling the problem is by means of function pointers, delegating functions, or to change completely the design of my code using functional progamming...

share|improve this question
1  
Your post is very very long... Try to point out (the lines) where you have problems. Perhaps have a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/149336/… –  Johan Lundberg Jul 15 '12 at 7:00
    
Thanks for the feedback Johan, I am working on it to make it more concise by highlighting the relevant code, it will be updated soon. –  scidom Jul 15 '12 at 9:29
    
Where exactly default template arguments enter the game, and what is your difficulty with them? –  n.m. Jul 15 '12 at 11:20
    
Thnak you both for the help. I edited my post to elaborate more on the problem. n.m, let me know if this answers your question. Johan, my post is even longer after editing, but at least I hope it explains the problem I am dealing with. Sorry for the lengthy post... –  scidom Jul 15 '12 at 15:36
    
You should be able to cut it down to a more abstract problem (not involving your spreading code etc.). That should allow you to shorten it, as well as make it easier to argue about for you and others. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 15 '12 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

If I understood all that correctly, you want dynamic dispatch based on something that won't change in your inner loop, and you want the inner loop kept free of any "if" statements or indirect dispatch. This can be done with a small restructuring of the code:

template<typename SPREADING>
void inner_loop(SPREADING* spreading) {
  while(something_long) {
    spreading->whatever();
  }
}

main(){
  if (opts.tentspreading) {
    TentSpreading spreading(stuff);
    inner_loop(&spreading);
  } else {
    IterativeMapSpreading spreading(other,stuff);
    inner_loop(&spreading);
  }
}

Note that the two inner_loop(&spreading) statements cannot be unified. They are in fact calling different functions with different arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
To properly avoid the virtual function, shouldn't inner_loop take a SPREADING& not a pointer? i.e. don't actually use a base class at all. –  user673679 Jan 14 '13 at 1:00
    
There is no base class here. I'm not using inheritence at all. As for pointer vs. reference, it makes no difference -- they'll compile down to the same thing. –  dspeyer Jan 15 '13 at 15:02

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