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I am running an event loop of the following form:

var i;
var j = 10;
for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {

    asycronouseProcess(callBackFunction() {
        alert(i);
    });
}

What I would like this to display is a series of alerts showing numbers 0 through 10. The problem is that by the time the call back function is triggered the loop has already gone through a few iterations and it displays a higher value of i. Any recommendation on how to fix this?

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How about adding the i parameter to the asynchronousProcess function? Which can pass it on to the callbackFunction –  Simon André Forsberg Jul 14 '12 at 23:00
    
possible duplicate of Javascript closure inside loops - simple practical example –  Felix Kling Jul 14 '12 at 23:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You have to freeze the value of i by passing it into a function somewhere so it's value exists uniquely for each iteration of the loop in a function closure. Otherwise, all asynch callbacks will just see the value of i at the end of the loop which is the value it has when they execute their callbacks (sometime later when the loop has finished), not each their own value.

Assuming you can't change the asynchronous function callback, then you could do it with a self executing function like this which creates a unique function closure for each iteration of the loop:

var i;
var j = 10;
for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    (function(cntr) {
        // here the value of i was passed into as the argument cntr
        // and will be captured in this function closure so each
        // iteration of the loop can have it's own value
        asycronouseProcess(function() {
            alert(cntr);
        });
    })(i);
}

If you can modify the asycronouseProcess() function, then you could just pass the value in there and have the asycronouseProcess() function the cntr back to the callback like this:

var i;
var j = 10;
for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    asycronouseProcess(i, function(cntr) {
        alert(cntr);
    });
}
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Added second option if you can modify the asycronouseProcess() function. –  jfriend00 Jul 14 '12 at 23:41

Any recommendation on how to fix this?

Several. You can use bind:

for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    asycronouseProcess(function (i) {
        alert(i);
    }.bind(null, i));
}

Or, if your browser supports let (it will be in the next ECMAScript version, however Firefox already supports it since a while) you could have:

for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    let k = i;
    asycronouseProcess(function() {
        alert(k);
    });
}

Or, you could do the job of bind manually (in case the browser doesn't support it, but I would say you can implement a shim in that case, it should be in the link above):

for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    asycronouseProcess(function(i) {
        return function () {
            alert(i)
        }
    }(i));
}

I usually prefer let when I can use it (e.g. for Firefox add-on); otherwise bind or a custom currying function (that doesn't need a context object).

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JavaScript code runs on a single thread, so you cannot principally block to wait for the first loop iteration to complete before beginning the next without seriously impacting page usability.

The solution depends on what you really need. If the example is close to exactly what you need, @Simon's suggestion to pass i to your async process is a good one.

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