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I noticed this "interesting" behaviour. Suppose you have a <div id="editableDiv" contenteditable="true"></div>

and you want to get its value (in this case, assume your value is something like 'hello ' (with a trailing whitespace). Afterwars, you want to convert that string into an array using split():

var string = window.getSelection().anchorNode.data // hello_ (_ means whitespace)
var myArray = string.split(' ') // ['hello '] -> includes whitespace!

However, when you manipulate a string without having to get that value through an editable div, everything works as usual.

Why and how can I force trailing whitespaces to produce another empty value in the resulting array (['hello', ''])?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
If you have string = "hello " then string.split(" ") does produce an array with two elements: ["hello", ""] as shown here: jsfiddle.net/zgXUp - can you reproduce your problem in a fiddle of your own? – nnnnnn Jul 15 '12 at 0:37
    
Here a "working" example: jsfiddle.net/vDDqG/1. Look at the console. Whitespace is included in myArray. – Robert Smith Jul 15 '12 at 0:47
1  
@doniyor - I didn't say the delimiter became the array element. Read my comment again - the second array element is an empty string. – nnnnnn Jul 15 '12 at 0:47
    
sorry @nnnnnn yeah i got you wrong.. – doniyor Jul 15 '12 at 0:47
    
By the way, you need to add something like "abc " in the editable div. Just in case it wasn't clear enough. – Robert Smith Jul 15 '12 at 0:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that a trailing space from an editable div appears to be character 160 which is a non-breaking space, rather than character 32 which is a "normal" space. You can work around this by splitting on a regex that matches a "normal" space or character 160 as follows:

var string = window.getSelection().anchorNode.data;
var myArray = string.split(/ |\u00A0/);
console.log(myArray);

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/zgXUp/2/

share|improve this answer
    
Nice catch. Seems to be working. Thanks! – Robert Smith Jul 15 '12 at 0:52
    
You're welcome. Note that if you enter several trailing spaces in a row it looks like some of them end up as normal spaces and some as non-breaking spaces. – nnnnnn Jul 15 '12 at 0:55
    
Yes, I noticed that. By the way, what did you use to know the code of that character... something like str.charCodeAt(0)? – Robert Smith Jul 15 '12 at 1:50
    
Yeah, I figured what you were seeing wasn't really a space so I used .charCodeAt() to confirm - as in the latest version of that demo fiddle... – nnnnnn Jul 15 '12 at 3:49
    
Great. Thanks a lot :-) – Robert Smith Jul 15 '12 at 3:56

check before splitting if the string has whitespace, if yes, then split normally and add this into array including the whitespace..

...
var splitted;
var array[];
String whitespace = "";
if(string.contains("")){
  splitted = string.split("");
  array.insert(splitted,whitespace);
 }
array.insert(splitted);

code is just from my fantasy, i am not coding guru, but is it okay for you?

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure what language you're referring to, but taking your idea, I wasn't able to tell whether a string coming from an editable div contains a whitespace. I used string.indexOf(' ') but it returns false every time. – Robert Smith Jul 15 '12 at 0:35
    
my code is just pseudo code, not a working one. look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1731190/… – doniyor Jul 15 '12 at 0:42
    
Thanks. No, regular expressions don't work either :-( – Robert Smith Jul 15 '12 at 0:49
    
never mind, my code is bullshit.. go ahead with nnnnnn – doniyor Jul 15 '12 at 0:50
    
Yeah, u r right :) – doniyor Jul 15 '12 at 7:03

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