Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm validating user input through functions.

Here's my code:

#include <stdio.h>

void get_income(double *pschool, double *pincome);
double get_double(void);

main()
{
    get_income(&pschool, pincome);
}

void get_income(double *pschool, double *pincome) {
    int tuition, supplies;

    printf("Enter tuition:");
    scanf("%d", &tuition);
    printf("Enter supplies:")
    scanf("%d", &supplies);

    *pSchool = tuition + supplies;
    return;
}

double get_double(void) {
    // validation code should go in here 
}

I need to validate the user supplied values for tuition and supplies to ensure they're both 0 or greater and not empty. Negative values or anything other than numeric digits should not be accepted.

The validation code should be in the get_double function and I can't seem to figure out how I can validate something that resides in a separate function. Looking for guidance please.

share|improve this question
    
why does the validation code need to be in get_double() instead of get_income()? right now its impossible to do what you want because get_double() has no way of knowing what the values of pschool and pincome are, they would either need to be passed to the function (preferable) or made global variables. –  cdk Jul 15 '12 at 0:00
    
That how i have been asked to do... maybe I have done something wrong... instruction only said that validation code should be in get_double however, i think it may could be done If i dont put scanf code in get_expenses function.. do you propose a better and close solution to me ? –  Hassan Z Jul 15 '12 at 0:06
    
At the very least, use int main() because C99 (C11) requires the int and only C99 (C11) allows you to miss the return off the end of main(). If your compiler is not complaining, you have not got enough warnings enabled. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 15 '12 at 1:05

3 Answers 3

to me, it sounds like the purpose of get_double() is to handle the user input. So this is what i'd do:

#include <stdio.h>

int get_double(double *in)
{
    scanf("%d", in);
    if (*in < 0) {
        printf("error message");
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

void get_income(double ptuition, double psupplies, double *pschool)
{
    *pschool = ptuition + psupplies;
}

int main(void)
{
    double ptuition, psupplies, pschool;

    printf("Enter tuition: ");
    if (get_double(&ptuition)) {
        return 1;
    }

    printf("\nEnter supplies: ");
    if (get_double(&psupplies)) {
        return 1;
    }

    get_income(ptuition, psupplies, &pschool);
    printf("Total school cost: %f", pschool);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
okay and how do I validate that user did not input anything but numbers ? @chris-dueck –  Hassan Z Jul 15 '12 at 0:48

For me, I don't really like to use scanf because of this. Here is what will I do to address your problem:

  1. Allocate array of chars. to act as the buffer to which input will be written. The size in general needs to reflect the use. That is, if I am only receiving a number no larger than 1000 (integral type), then I would only allocate 6 chars. The last two is for the '\n' and '\0'.
  2. Initialize the one before the last element in the array to '\n'to detect overflows.
  3. Use fegts() function to receive the input.
  4. Check for overflow by checking if the one before the last element that I initialized to '\n' was changes. If so, I report overflow error, otherwise continue execution.
  5. Use atof() or atoi() functions to convert to double or integer value respectively.

I would like to know if my approach contains any kind of bugs, but as far I know, it works fine.

share|improve this answer

There are many issues with the code, including:

  • not checking the scanf() function finds data
  • incorrect declaration of main()
  • passing unused pointers to get_income()
  • not returning statuses from checking functions
  • not reporting on entered data
  • not declaring variables in main()
  • function names not matching purpose
  • reading integers for storage in floating point numbers
  • etc.

You'd probably do better with "read a line and parse it with sscanf()" than "let scanf() read data"; it is easier to handle the error reporting.

These observations lead to:

#include <stdio.h>

int get_tuition_and_supplies(double *ptuition, double *psupplies);
int get_double(double *pvalue);

int main(void)
{
    double tuition, supplies;
    if (get_tuition_and_supplies(&tuition, &supplies) == 0)
        printf("Tuition: %.2f; supplies %.2f\n", tuition, supplies);
    return(0);
}

int get_tuition_and_supplies(double *ptuition, double *psupplies)
{
    int rc = -1;    // Failure
    printf("Enter tuition: ");
    if (get_double(ptuition) == 0)
    {
        printf("Enter supplies: ");
        if (get_double(psupplies) == 0)
            rc = 0;
    }
    return rc;
}

int get_double(double *pvalue)
{
    char buffer[4096];
    int rc = -1;
    if (fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin) == 0)
        fprintf(stderr, "EOF (or error) reading data\n");
    else if (sscanf(buffer, "%lf", pvalue) != 1)
        fprintf(stderr, "Did not find a number in input (%.32s)\n", buffer);
    /* Could check for no extracharacters (blanks allowed) up to newline */
    else if (*pvalue < 0.0)
        fprintf(stderr, "Value (%g) may not be negative\n", *pvalue);
    else
        rc = 0;
    return rc;
}

The idiom of 'set return code (rc) to failure until proven successful' is one effective technique for handling validation. It might be better to include the prompting in the get_double() function, so that its signature becomes:

int get_double(const char *prompt, double *pvalue);

This allows you to simplify the code in get_tuition_and_supplies() to:

int rc = -1;    // Failure
if (get_double("Enter tuition: ", ptuition) == 0 &&
    get_double("Enter supplies: ", psupplies) == 0)
    rc = 0;
return rc;

This extends neatly to handling multiple values instead of just two.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.