Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Assembler with AT&t syntax under linux. I need to divide and multiply 3 numbers (a,b,c). The operation is likely a/b*c,i've tried using idiv and imul istruction but of course those works on integer numbers so i'm getting total inaccurate results from them. I also tried to use fidiv and fimul istruction to use float in calculation but i'm getting totally wrong results.So probably i'm doing the operation on the wrong registers. Can someone please do me an example on how to use fidiv/fimul under AT&T? Wich registers do those istructions use?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
"I also tried to use fidiv and fimul..." Then show us what you tried. –  Jens Björnhager Jul 15 '12 at 0:07
add comment

1 Answer 1

As AT&T is the output syntax of gas (GNU Assembler), you shouldn't think too long. Just write it in C and generate the assembler output using -S switch.

Exemple:

If it type the following program in source file abc.c

main(){
    int a = 7;
    int b = 3;
    int c = 2;
    return (double)a/(double)b*(double)c;
}

Then compile it using gcc -S abc.c

I get the following assembly source code:

.file   "abc.c"
.text
.globl  main
.type   main, @function
main:
.LFB0:
.cfi_startproc
pushq   %rbp
.cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
.cfi_offset 6, -16
movq    %rsp, %rbp
.cfi_def_cfa_register 6
movl    $7, -4(%rbp)
movl    $3, -8(%rbp)
movl    $2, -12(%rbp)
cvtsi2sd    -4(%rbp), %xmm0
cvtsi2sd    -8(%rbp), %xmm1
movapd  %xmm0, %xmm2
divsd   %xmm1, %xmm2
movapd  %xmm2, %xmm1
cvtsi2sd    -12(%rbp), %xmm0
mulsd   %xmm1, %xmm0
cvttsd2si   %xmm0, %eax
popq    %rbp
.cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
ret
.cfi_endproc
.LFE0:
.size   main, .-main
.ident  "GCC: (Debian 4.6.3-1) 4.6.3"
.section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

What it does should be clear enough : reserve space for 3 int on stack, store constant values in them, convert them to double (cvtsi2sd), perform division (caveat: you write a/b in order div b, a, the result goes in second register). Etc. What is obvious is that the compiler does not bother to use old FPU 8087 instruction set as nowaday there is simpler ways to perform floating point computing without having to play with FPU stack. As the question doesn't say anything on the target system, I will do as my compiler do to perform such computing.

As it may still be unclear for some people (my answer was downvoted), I performed a bit of reordering on gcc output (to avoid moving uselessly things around) and added comments. The only likely pitfall is the order of arguments for div. In which register to put datas and get results is up to the reader.

    .file   "abc.c"
    .text
    .globl  main
    .type   main, @function
    main:
    .LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6

    # Load integer 7 (variable a), convert it to double
    movl    $7, -4(%rbp)
    cvtsi2sd    -4(%rbp), %xmm0

    # Load integer 3, (variable b) convert it to double
    movl    $3, -8(%rbp)
    cvtsi2sd    -8(%rbp), %xmm1

    # Load integer 2, (variable c) convert it to double
    movl    $2, -12(%rbp)
    cvtsi2sd    -12(%rbp), %xmm2

    #   a / b -> written "div b, a" result goes in a (%xmm0)
    divsd   %xmm1, %xmm0 

    #   b * c -> result goes in c (%xmm2)
    mulsd   %xmm0, %xmm2 

    # convert result back to integer
    cvttsd2si   %xmm2, %eax
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
    .LFE0:
    .size   main, .-main
    .ident  "GCC: (Debian 4.6.3-1) 4.6.3"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

On Linux, you can compile execute and show the result (truncated to int and truncated to 256 as it is the process result) simply doing:

gcc abc.s ; ./a.out ; echo $?

To make the answer more complete, you can easily write an equivalent program using old FPU (it didn't bothered setting the truncating mode of FPU, so you may get 5 instead of 4 it its truncating to the nearest integer):

    .file   "abc.c"
    .text
    .globl  main
    .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6

    # Load integer 7 (variable a), convert it to double
    movl    $7, -4(%rbp)

    # Load integer 3, (variable b) convert it to double
    movl    $3, -8(%rbp)

    # Load integer 2, (variable c) convert it to double
    movl    $2, -12(%rbp)

    fild    -12(%rbp)
    fild    -8(%rbp)
    fild    -4(%rbp)

    #   a / b -> written "div b, a" result goes in a (%mm0)
    fdivp   %st(0), %st(1) 

    #   b * c -> result goes in c (%mm2)
    fmulp   %st(0), %st(1) 

    # convert result back to integer
    fist    -4(%rbp)
    movl    -4(%rbp), %eax
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE0:
    .size   main, .-main
    .ident  "GCC: (Debian 4.6.3-1) 4.6.3"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks,you answer clarified me a lot of things,i was doing operation on integer registers :\ Anyway Seems that i've trouble using rbp register,searching on the net it seems it's a 64 bit register while i must use only 32 bit one.(It's a school project so it must compile without linking reference or modifying environment vars).I tried understanding this code but i can't understand what it do after "fmulp %st, %st(1)" Any ideas?Thanks. –  user1526262 Jul 15 '12 at 10:42
    
This is what i get so far but the result is wrong,using X=-1 and K1=5 it gives me 65534 instead of -2.5 or -2/-3 (for cast) –  user1526262 Jul 15 '12 at 10:56
    
Ok,i've solved with this code,i was using wrong ebp offsett. Thanks a lot for the explanation kriss,it was really very useful!! –  user1526262 Jul 15 '12 at 12:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.