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You can view my problem:

enter image description here

http://i.stack.imgur.com/cGoEU.png

That image is covering my login form. How do I get it to move behind the textboxes & sign in button?

This is my code:

<img src="C:\Users\George\Documents\HTML\My Local Soccer\pics\icons\gradient box.gif" 
    style="position:absolute; top: 155px; left: 480px; width:auto; height:auto;">
<input type="text" class="tb7" value="Username" style="margin-left: 563px" 
    maxlength="20" onfocus="if(this.value == 'Username') {this.value='';}" />         
</br>
<input type="text" class="tb8"  value="Password" style="margin-left: 563px;"   
    maxlength="20" onfocus="if(this.value =='Password') {this.value='';}"/>
<input type="image" height="25px"   width="67px" style="vertical-align:top;"
    src="C:\Users\George\Documents\HTML\My Local Soccer\pics\icons\sign in.gif" />
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What are you trying to do with the image? –  codingbiz Jul 15 '12 at 1:43
    
Gee, I wonder if anyone is going to mention a background-image on the form or other containing element? Nevermind, the img wasn't included in the source code correctly (within SO's markup). –  Jared Farrish Jul 15 '12 at 1:46

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try:

<div id="form_wrapper" style="background-image:url('img/yellow.png');">
<img src="C:\Users\George\Documents\HTML\My Local Soccer\pics\icons\gradient box.gif" 
    style="position:absolute; top: 155px; left: 480px; width:auto; height:auto;">
<input type="text" class="tb7" value="Username" style="margin-left: 563px" 
    maxlength="20" onfocus="if(this.value == 'Username') {this.value='';}" />         
</br>
<input type="text" class="tb8"  value="Password" style="margin-left: 563px;"   
    maxlength="20" onfocus="if(this.value =='Password') {this.value='';}"/>
<input type="image" height="25px"   width="67px" style="vertical-align:top;"
    src="C:\Users\George\Documents\HTML\My Local Soccer\pics\icons\sign in.gif" />
</div>

Enjoy and good luck!

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The easiest way to do this is through CSS' z-Index. Basically what it does it define the stacked location of elements. The higher the number, the more on top it is of other elements. Since you did not provide the top HTML for these input fields, I cannot give you a concrete example on how to do this, but I would be happy to help you further if you provide more code.

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Easiest way is background-image on the form and forget the img element. –  Jared Farrish Jul 15 '12 at 1:53
    
Well...I would say forget about the image completely and do it in CSS/ JS, but then the question wasn't complete enough for me to be enough of a judge of it I suppose. –  Battle_707 Jul 15 '12 at 2:18
    
Javascript? You only need CSS. See: cssplay.co.uk/boxes/css3-background.html (Of course, background-size isn't supported in IE8 or less, so if the width is truly needed, that would need to be taken into account.) –  Jared Farrish Jul 15 '12 at 2:21
    
Owh, I'm sorry for the confusion. There is JS in the code in the question (to remove 'Username'/ 'Password' from the fields when focused on). For the style formatting it is indeed not required. –  Battle_707 Jul 15 '12 at 2:25

Try with style="z-index:-5;" and position relative or absolute

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wrap inputs in a div and and style it with the image in background.

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I assume there's a form around it too, but at least this isn't a cockamamie z-index suggestion. –  Jared Farrish Jul 15 '12 at 1:47

I'm not sure how your orange rectangle fits into your HTML but elements can be placed in front or behind other elements using the z-index style property which you can append to the style attribute.

More information on this can be found here: http://htmldog.com/reference/cssproperties/z-index/

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Please do not link to W3Schools. Please read here: w3fools.com –  Battle_707 Jul 15 '12 at 1:48

You need to set z-indexes in css.

<img src="C:\Users\George\Documents\HTML\My Local Soccer\pics\icons\gradient box.gif" 
    style="position:absolute; z-index: 50; top: 155px; left: 480px; width:auto; height:auto;">


<input type="text" class="tb7" value="Username" style="margin-left: 563px; z-index: 50;position: relative;" maxlength="20"
    onfocus="if(this.value == 'Username') {this.value='';}" />      
</br>

<input type="text" class="tb8"  value="Password" style="margin-left: 563px; z-index: 50;position: relative;"   maxlength="20"
    onfocus="if(this.value =='Password') {this.value='';}" />

<input type="image" height="25px"   width="67px" style="vertical-align:top; z-index: 50; position: relative;"
    src="C:\Users\George\Documents\HTML\My Local Soccer\pics\icons\sign in.gif" />

Keep in mind that for using z-index you'll need to specify the position as I did it, even if you want to use the default position.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not the right image; that's the submit button. The img itself wasn't included correctly in the SO source markup. –  Jared Farrish Jul 15 '12 at 1:49
    
Next point is that the containing element's position will also influence where it will go; hence, if it is in a form with position: static, you will then place the img in position with whichever element parent to it in the DOM has position. body is probably what will take that place, not the obvious effect I assume. In short, position: relative should be applied to the positioning parent element (form? div? fieldset?). And, y'know, putting it with background-image on a containing element instead of an img element is "best" IMO. –  Jared Farrish Jul 15 '12 at 1:59
    
Of course. We, the ridiculous z-index-posters, started by assuming to position an input, where you don't know what should happen with later, so replacing it with an backgroundimage wasn't an option. Thanks for additional infos although there may be lots of other what-ifs on this topic. –  32bitfloat Jul 15 '12 at 2:09
    
It is what the OP asked for, yes (and it wasn't that hard to see the markup wasn't right). It is my opinion that if a solution is requested based on faulty logic to offer the better solution. More markup and positioning willy-nilly is a less optimal solution in most cases, but whatever. I've not downvoted any, but it is important to make note about the parent positioning, most beginners will not pick this up. –  Jared Farrish Jul 15 '12 at 2:19

If you're using a 'gradient box' as background, you should probably consider using CSS for a similar effect instead.

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