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i've searched what does it mean by temporary variable but i couldn't & i couldn't understand. i've done the if-else structures without a temporary variable and now i'm trying to do if-else structure and a temporary variable. I couldn't find the difference.

the question is to

  1. write a program that reads three integers(a,b and c) and prints the largest of values using if else structure and a temporary variable.
  2. if else structures without a temporary variable.

I've done the first question.

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
int a,b,c;

cout<<"a : ";
cin>>a;
cout<<"b : ";
cin>>b;
cout<<"c : ";
cin>>c;

if(a>b && a>c)
{
    cout<<"largest : "<<a;
}else{
    if(b>a && b>c)
    {
        cout<<"largest : "<<b;
    }else{
        if(c>a && c>b)
        {
            cout<<"largest : "<<a;
        }else{
            cout<<"error!";
        }
    }
}


getch();
return 0;
}

but for the second question is it like this?

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
int a,b,c;
int max;

cout<<"a : ";
cin>>a;
cout<<"b : ";
cin>>b;
cout<<"c : ";
cin>>c;


if(a>b && a>c)
{
    max=a;
    cout<<"largest : "<<max;
}else{
    if(b>a && b>c)
    {
        max=b;
        cout<<"largest : "<<max;
    }else{
        if(c>a && c>b)
        {
            max=c;
            cout<<"largest : "<<max;
        }else{
            cout<<"error!";
        }
    }
}


getch();
return 0;
}

i just want to be confirm because i don't exactly understand what does it mean by temporary variable. thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The two are identical?! –  Anirudh Ramanathan Jul 15 '12 at 2:08
    
No, one has the temporary variable max. –  Steve Wellens Jul 15 '12 at 2:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Actually, you've done the second question as your first result. The second version (answering the first question) should look more like this:

int max;
if (a > b && a > c) max = a;
else if (b > a && b > c) max = b;
else max = c;
cout << max;

The purpose of the "temporary" variable is to avoid repeating all the print statement as your first example has.

I don't like this use of the word temporary. Temporary variables have a special meaning in C++ totally related to variables created by the compiler implicitly when you use certain code constructs. "max" is not a temporary variable, in that sense. Your instructor is perhaps being loose in his use of the terminology.

share|improve this answer

The exact meaning of "temporary" can vary, but in this case, it just means a variable other than the ones used to hold the inputs. I think a better term might be "intermediate".

When you are only trying to find the largest of three values, it is a little difficult to see the advantage of having intermediate variables, but imagine if you were trying to find the maximum of 100 values. How would you do it without having an intermediate variable?

share|improve this answer

Maybe the point of the exercise is to demonstrate why temporary variables are good? If so, maybe this is what the asker of the question wanted:

int a, b, c;

...

// No temporary variable - your code is the simplest possible
if(a>b && a>c)
{
    cout<<"largest : "<<a;
}else{
    if(b>a && b>c)
    {
        cout<<"largest : "<<b;
    }else{
        if(c>a && c>b)
        {
            cout<<"largest : "<<a;
        }else{
            cout<<"error!";
        }
    }
}

// May use a temporary variable - code can be simplified
int max = a;
if (max < b)
    max = b;
if (max < c)
    max = c;
cout<<"largest : "<<max;
share|improve this answer

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