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I am studying the Django framework, reading the documentation, but have not found references on how to create more than one application on the same project, where each application has multiple apps. For example, the application Blog, with apps Users, Comments, Posts, ..., implementation and Tasks with the apps Clients, Users, Attachments ... How should I do?

localhost
localhost/blog/ (posts, user, comment, ...)
localhost/tasks/ (task, user, attachment, ...)

<my project>
-- manage.py
-- <project name>
-- -- blog
-- -- -- posts
-- -- -- -- views.py
-- -- -- -- urls.py
-- -- -- -- models.py
...
-- -- tasks
-- -- -- attachments
-- -- -- -- views.py
-- -- -- -- urls.py
-- -- -- -- models.py
...
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Each app will have these in their folder:

  • views.py
  • models.py
  • others optionals (admin.py...)

So, you have :

Project
-- manage.py
-- Project
-- -- views.py
-- -- models.py
-- -- others
-- -- APP1
-- -- -- views.py
-- -- -- models.py
-- -- -- others
-- -- APP2
-- -- -- views.py
-- -- -- models.py
-- -- -- others
-- -- APPX
-- -- -- views.py
-- -- -- models.py
-- -- -- others

The utility is the distinction between functionalities (call Notification.models.notification if you have a Notification app and a notification model in it).

A model is the architecture of an object. So you will call for example User.username or Task.name. Django creates automaticaly in the database the table.

Another tool of Django : you can use admin view (wich can edit, create, edit, objects that use your models) or change this interface (look that page)

If you want you can make an identification system, and create forms, you can use your own admin system.

WITH YOUR EXAMPLE:

<my project>
-- manage.py
-- <project name>
-- -- urls.py
-- -- models.py <--- User model exists in Django and here you can add informations to the defaut model it is in this file because I suppose it will be used in all your project.
-- -- views.py

-- -- blog    <--- It's an app.
-- -- -- -- views.py 
-- -- -- -- urls.py
-- -- -- -- models.py <--- Posts, Comments are models for the blog, so you explain them here.

-- -- tasks   <--- Another app.
-- -- -- attachments
-- -- -- -- views.py
-- -- -- -- urls.py
-- -- -- -- models.py  <--- Task model for exemple
share|improve this answer
    
it helped me a lot, thanks –  Anderson Carlos Woss Jul 16 '12 at 3:57
    
Good luck ! I was in your case two weeks ago and now i think django in an incredible language !! –  Nico401 Jul 16 '12 at 7:25
    
I began to study it for a project at the University of home automation with ZigBee network –  Anderson Carlos Woss Jul 16 '12 at 17:04
    
i have the similar structure and my apps are app1 and app2.Now when i request the about page in my app2 it still renders the page from app1. for the first app1 i have this as urlpattern /project/app1/ and for the second i have /project/app2/about.html --shows from the first app. –  cafebabe1991 Mar 19 '14 at 9:13

Things you should understand about django:

  1. URL map has no bearing on the file system or the application code. This means that your URLs do not have a 1-to-1 relationship with your code. You can have multiple URLs pointing to same piece of code (pointing to the same view). This is different than PHP for example, where URLs map to the file system.

  2. Applications are not "widgets" or "portlets". Application is just a python module with some files already included (views.py, models.py and __init__.py); and you can have as many apps as you want. You can also have applications that are not accessible using a URL - they are just there to support other applications; and your applications do not have to have the same name as the URLs either.

So keeping that in mind ... you can create one application, call it www, and inside its views.py, define these very creatively named methods:

def blog(request):
   pass

def tasks(request):
   pass

Now in your urls.py, you can have:

url(r'^blog/$','www.views.blog',name='blog-index'),
url(r'^blog/posts/$','www.views.blog',name='blog-posts',kwargs={'view_posts': True}),
url(r'^tasks/$','www.views.tasks',name='task-index'),
url(r'^tasks/attachments/$','www.views.tasks',name='task-attachments'),
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Comparing Django to PHP is improper. Django is a framework on top on python. PHP could be compared to python or to Jinja templating language, but not Django. –  Mikhail Oct 25 '13 at 3:12

You are confused about what an app is. An app is just a collection of related functionality, usually (but not necessarily) including models, views and templates.

"Users" is not an app - it's a model, but you would usually use the built-in django.contrib.auth app to provide user functionality. Any app can use any other app's code, including models. And you can have as many models as you like in a single app.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I need to make my site with an administrative interface, without using the contrib.admin. How do to separate the logic? "This view is the administration interface and this is the public interface"? –  Anderson Carlos Woss Jul 15 '12 at 3:17
    
If you want. Or split it up into two view files - views are just Python functions, they can live anywhere. Or have a separate app for all the admin functions across all your other apps. It's up to you. –  Daniel Roseman Jul 15 '12 at 3:39

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