Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I fill variables, can I do something like this?:

$type = isset( $_GET['type'] ) ?  $_GET['type'] : die();

By doing so, if 'type' is not in the request, my function will exit. Is this the correct way to use die()?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you just want your function to exit, use return. However, it's not an expression, so you'll need to change it to an if statement:

if(!isset($_GET['type'])) {
    return;
}

$type = $_GET['type'];

If you do want your whole page to stop execution, then yes, that's correct (but I'd still use an if for clarity).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 the ternary operator is evil –  Lusitanian Jul 15 '12 at 2:27
3  
@David No way, not evil! Just not appropriate for this purpose. Ternary is for conditional value assignment or return, not complex branching or script termination. –  Michael Berkowski Jul 15 '12 at 2:28
3  
Ternary evil? Rubbish... –  Brad Jul 15 '12 at 2:28
    
@Brad / Michael I suppose I mean misuse of it...when it's used properly it's clear what it's doing but far too often it is misused. –  Lusitanian Jul 15 '12 at 2:45

Yes and no. Yes in that what you're doing is technically correct and will terminate the script if the variable is not present, but no in that you if you ever want to test your code you shouldn't use the die construct. PHP is an object oriented language (since version 5) and a very powerful one at that. It supports the use of exceptions for advanced error-handling which you might want to use here.

share|improve this answer

you can't use die() to fill a variable. die() terminates your code. Instead, you may consider the code below:

$type = isset( $_GET['type'] ) ? $_GET['type'] : null;

share|improve this answer
    
I beg to differ. –  minitech Jul 15 '12 at 2:28
    
@minitech, Can you elaborate on what you are trying to explain with your codepad example? –  Brad Jul 15 '12 at 2:30
    
@Brad: You can put it in an inline conditional, no problem. Unless that's not what sikas meant? –  minitech Jul 15 '12 at 2:30
    
@minitech, Oh, this is sikas' post... I was just curious what you were getting at, that's all. I don't think sikas is saying that you can't die() there. I think he's saying that since execution stops, it's useless. –  Brad Jul 15 '12 at 2:31
    
@Brad You got my point here .. better to provide a custom 404 than to just show a white empty page die(); or some plain text die('Some Plain Text'); –  sikas Jul 16 '12 at 4:15

The Ternary Operator Docs says that this:

$type = isset( $_GET['type'] ) ?  $_GET['type'] : die();

Is identical to this if/else statement:

if ( isset( $_GET['type'] ) )
    $type = $_GET['type'];
else 
    $type = die();

It works because die() will be called and will stop the script execution, but isn't a good practice. Insted of this a think is better you use and if/else statement and simply call die() if $_GET['type'] doesn't exist, as below.

if ( isset( $_GET['type'] ) )
    $type = $_GET['type'];
else 
    die('type not found');
share|improve this answer

The die() function will end your entire PHP process, not just exit the function you're in. Beyond that, the code is relying on the fact that PHP is kind of goofy. die() is strictly supposed to be a void function, but your call is depending on it returning something -- which it does, but shouldn't.

What you really want is a straightforward if statement:

if( ! isset($_GET['type']) )
    return;

$type = $_GET['type'];

The other thing is, if this code is in a function, the value of $type will not be preserved unless it's been declared as global.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.