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int  a = 5;
if(a = 5)
{
    cout<<"111111"<<endl;
}
if(a = 0)
{
    cout<<"22222"<<endl;
}

the reslut is

111111 Press any key to continue

acrroding to some commments,assign success,the result is true。

"a = 0" and a = 1" should assign success.but the result is only the first executed....

why ?

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3 Answers 3

Some comments? That seems dodgy and in this case is incorrect.

The result of operator= on ints is the value that has been assigned. In this case a = 5 results in 5 and a = 0 results in 0. Since 5 evaluates as true you see "111111" but since 0 evaluates as false you don't see "22222".

As for why assignment results in the value being assigned, take the case with multiple assignments:

a = b = 5;

This is the same as:

a = (b = 5);

So for this to work as expected (b = 5) must return 5.

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nice code example –  Hausen Zheng Jul 15 '12 at 5:04

The result of a=5 is 5, and the result of a=0 is 0, so your program is like:

int a = 5;
if(5)
{
    cout<<"111111"<<endl;
}
if(0)
{
    cout<<"22222"<<endl;
}

Since the if statement requires a boolean value, 5 converts to true and 0 converts to false implicitly. so your program is now like:

int a = 5;
if(true)
{
    cout<<"111111"<<endl;
}
if(false)
{
    cout<<"22222"<<endl;
}

So it will print "111111" only.

"acrroding to some commments,assign success,the result is true" The result of assignment is the result of expression in the left side.

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very good interpretation –  Hausen Zheng Jul 15 '12 at 5:01

"a = 0" and a = 1" should assign success.but the result is only the first executed....

Nope. 0 is false, you may as well have written"

if(0) { /* some code which will never execute */ }

The if statement evaluates the result of the expression between the parentheses, which means that the expression itself must be evaluated completely before the condition is checked.

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