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This is an interesting quirk I found while method chaining and I'm having difficulty bypassing it. I'm sure there's a solution or another way. It's tough to explain but I'll do my best.

Example:

You have three functions which are part of a class, as well as 2 protected properties as follows.

class Chain {

  protected $_str  = '';
  protected $_part = 0;

  public function __toString() {
    return implode(' ', $this->_str);
  }

  public function AAA () {
    $this->_str[$this->_part] = 'AAA';
    $this->_part++;
    return $this;
  }

  public function BBB () {
    $this->_str[$this->_part] = 'BBB';
    $this->_part++;
    return $this;
  }

  public function wrap ($str) {
    $part = $this->_part - 1;
    $this->_str[$part] = "({$str})";
    return $this;
  }

}

Now when chaining these methods and specifically using the wrap method, the strings from previous chains are unintentionally appended. Example:

$chain = new Chain();
$chain->AAA()->BBB()->wrap($chain->AAA());
echo $chain;

What you would expect the string to look like is AAA BBB (AAA).

However, what actually returns is AAA BBB (AAA BBB AAA).

Why is it that wrap() takes all the previous methods called within the chain instead of only the method that's actually wrapped by it? What is the best way around this assuming there is one?

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Here is a thought: stop chaining methods, it's a bad practice. –  tereško Jul 15 '12 at 3:33
    
$this->_query[$part] = "({$str})"; probably supposed to be $this->_str[$part] = "({$str})"; –  alfasin Jul 15 '12 at 3:36
    
@tereško Your thought is completely subjective and chaining can be either good or bad depending on the situation. –  Chris Bornhoft Jul 15 '12 at 3:40
    
here is a quick flowchart for decision to use chaining : i.stack.imgur.com/WjT6C.jpg –  tereško Jul 15 '12 at 4:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

$chain->AAA()->BBB() is doing the first two 'AAA' and 'BBB' - obvious.
Then the $chain->AAA() which comes inside wrap($chain->AAA()) does the 3rd 'AAA'.
and last, the wrap method takes all the three and wraps them with () and concatenated to the first 'AAA' and 'BBB' using this line: $this->_str[$part] = "({$str})";
which resolves to: AAA BBB (AAA BBB AAA).

UPDATE:
I believe that what you're trying to do, is to avoid the side-effect of returning this from methods AAA() and BBB() - will be achieved with the following changes:

<?php
class Chain {

  protected $_str  = '';
  protected $_part = 0;

  public function __toString() {
    return implode(' ', $this->_str);
  }

  public function AAA () {
    $this->_str[$this->_part] = 'AAA';
    $this->_part++;
    return "AAA";
  }

  public function BBB () {
    $this->_str[$this->_part] = 'BBB';
    $this->_part++;
    return "BBB";
  }

  public function wrap ($str) {
    $part = $this->_part - 1;
    $this->_str[$part] = "({$str})";
    return $str;
  }

}

$chain = new Chain();
$chain->AAA();
$chain->BBB();
$chain->wrap($chain->AAA());
echo $chain->__toString();

?>
share|improve this answer
    
downvoter, care to explain ? –  alfasin Jul 15 '12 at 3:44
    
Yes I'm well aware of what it's doing by my given output... WHY is it taking all previous methods as an argument when only one is passed and what is a good way to avoid it is my question. –  Chris Bornhoft Jul 15 '12 at 3:44
    
I explained it in my answer: the line $this->_str[$part] = "({$str})"; is taking EVERYTHING which is currently in $this->_str and wraps it with () –  alfasin Jul 15 '12 at 3:46
    
See, the method $chain->AAA() returns this. Try calling: echo $chain->AAA(); and you'll see what I mean. –  alfasin Jul 15 '12 at 3:49
    
Thanks. I would expect it to NOT add the others because only one of the methods is within the wrap. By looking at it, I wouldn't expect the previous calls to jump inside and be appended, chained or not. I realize separating them would give a different output, however it seems odd to me. –  Chris Bornhoft Jul 15 '12 at 3:52

I'd call it kind of a 'race condition'. It seems PHP first interprets the $chain->AAA()->BBB().

Then $chain->_part is 2 and $chain->_str is 'AAA BBB'.

Then, to be able to call wrap, the argument, so $chain->AAA() is run.

Then $chain->_part is 3 and $chain->_str is 'AAA BBB AAA'.

Finally wrap is called, warpping up the 'AAA BBB AAA'. I would seperate the wrap()-call and reset $chain->_part back to zero in between.

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This is a good walkthrough, however it still seems like wrap() should only take the methods you pass as arguments even when being chained. The problem is, with unchaining not being an option, how do you go about avoiding it? Seems like there is no solution. –  Chris Bornhoft Jul 15 '12 at 3:56
    
Well, actually you could write a function XYZ where you reset _part to zero. This way, you don't have to unchain and still reset _part at the right time using $chain->AAA()->BBB()->XYZ()->wrap($chain->AAA()); –  Philipp Grassl Jul 15 '12 at 4:05

The calling queue is:

1. $chain->AAA() //this is first method not in wrap() method, you have now AAA
2. $chain->BBB() //then next method, you have now AAA BBB
3. $chain->AAA() //again AAA() method inside wrap method, so you have AAA BBB AAA

inside the wrap() you are putting chain(which is AAA BBB AAA after 3rd step) string in () so you have AAA BBB AAA string at the end of _part array.

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