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I have a Contribution and Reward model. A contribution belongs_to a reward. I want a contribution to be valid only its amount is greater than its reward's minimum_contribution.

So I have

Class Contribution < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :reward_id, :reward
  belongs_to :reward

  validates_presence_of :amount
  validates_numericality_of :amount, greater_than: 0
  validates_presence_of :reward

  validates_each :amount, unless: SOMECONDITION do |contribution, attr, amount|
    reward = contribution.reward
    contribution.errors.add(attr,
                            "Contribution must be at least #{reward.minimum_contribution}") unless amount > reward.minimum_contribution
  end
end

My question is what is appropriate to put for SOMECONDITION. Before this validation is run, I need to make sure that

  1. the contribution's valid is defined (or even that it's numeric). Otherwise comparing in unless value > reward.minimum_contribution will have an error because you can't compare to nil
  2. the contribution's reward is defined
  3. the contribution's reward's minimum_contribution is defined and numeric

Should I be doing this ALL in the lambda for SOMECONDITION? Something just feels wrong about having so many guards for a single validation. Am I designing this properly? Is it ever proper design to throw an exception in my validation, for instance, unless amount > contribution.reward.minimum_contribution when amount is actually nil? (Obviously I always expect amount to be numeric but I'm not sure how paranoid I should be in my validation / what exactly I can trust)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can replace validates_each :amount with:

...
validate :validate_mininum_amount

def validate_mininum_amount
  errors.add :amount, "some error message" if amount.to_i < reward.min_contribution
end
...

Note: Adding .to_i ensures that the amount will be 0 if it is nil. Or you could add a specific check for nil. Add any other checks you need to, in the validate_mininum_amount method.

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