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I've been looking at some ruby code and noticed that some people treat methods like variables or constants.

class Test

   def welcome_message
      "Hello World"
   end

   def greet_user
      p welcome_message
   end
end

And then you might write a new class that inherits from this Test class, but change how it behaves.

class New_Test < Test

   # changing the welcome message
   def welcome_message
      "Greetings"
   end
end

When is it an appropriate time to do something like this? It appears to allow you to write more flexible code since I can perform more complex computations before returning a value, but I can't come up with a way to justify writing a piece of code like the two Test classes above.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why It Works

In Ruby, every method returns a value. In your given example of p welcome_message you are asking Ruby to print the string representation of the return value of #welcome_message. (Technically it's writing object.inspect to standard output, but it amounts to the same thing here.)

If "Hello World" were something other object than a String, the result would still be similar. For example, if #welcome_method returned a Fixnum instead of a String, it would still appear to be printing a string.

Return Values

You could store your message in a class or instance variable, or use getter or setter methods on an object. However, sometimes it's simply more convenient to use a return value directly in an expression rather than using a variable for intermediate storage.

Instead of storing and then dereferencing a variable like this:

def welcome_message
  @message = "Hello World"
end

def greet_user
  p @message
end

welcome_message # store the variable
greet_user      # dereference then print the variable

you can just use the return value from #welcome_message directly.

This is unlikely to matter much in a contrived example like the one in the original question, but it may save time, effort, or memory in larger applications. Even if not, intermediate variables can be a source of bugs or programmer error, and it's often just semantically clearer to use the values directly.

While this doesn't apply to your limited example, it's also a better practice to use an object's public interface to request information. In such cases, methods that return values are essential.

Ruby is not an orthogonal language; there's usually more than one valid way to do something. In the end, it's about the semantics of what you're trying to express in your code.

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Methods are methods, not variables or constants.

   def greet_user
      p welcome_message
   end

is same as the below because the () could be omitted.

   def greet_user
      p welcome_message()
   end

   def welcome_message
      "Greetings"
   end

is same as the below because the return could be omitted.

   def welcome_message
      return "Greetings"
   end
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What do you do when you want a public, constant value for instances of a class? You could do this...

def initialize
  @welcome_message = "Greetings"
end
attr_reader :welcome_message

But that declares an instance variable, which doesn't seem fitting since its value will never change and will be the same for all instances.

WELCOME_MESSAGE = "Greetings"
def welcome_message
  self.class::WELCOME_MESSAGE
end

That seems more fitting... but isn't it kind of silly? We declare a constant, but it's really only going to be used in welcome_message. There's no need for anything else to use the ugly self.class::WELCOME_MESSAGE. Why not just cut out the middle man? Thus:

def welcome_message
  "Greetings"
end
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