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I am trying to figure out why my program crashes right when calling ll_print. [[this is a pretty simple and straight forward question i am not sure of what to add really to fill up the explanation gap]]

    struct ll{
          struct ll* next;
          int n;
        } ll;

   void ll_print(struct ll *l){
      while (l) {
        printf("%d ", l->n);
        l=l->next;
      }
    }

    void ll_fill(struct ll *l, int n){
      struct ll *temp= NULL;
       while (n>0){
        l= (struct ll*)malloc(sizeof(struct ll));
        l->n=n;
        l->next= temp;
        temp=l;
        n--;
      }
     }

    int main(void){
      int i=0;
      struct ll *l;                                                                                                                                          
      ll_fill(l, 10);
      ll_print(l);  /** causing a segmntation fault **/                                                                                                                                                                 
    }
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This happens because l pointer is never initialized. It seems that you expect ll_fill to initialize it, but you are wrong - it is being passed by value (read - by copy), and whatever you assign to l in ll_fill function does not assign a value to l declared inside main. To achieve what you want, pass l by pointer (you will have pointer to pointer). Alternatively, make it a return value of ll_fill and do l = ll_fill(l, 10);. Also, get yourself a debugger - it will help you a great deal.

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Your solution worked greatly, yet I am still confused of why I'd have to pass a pointer to a pointer to the ll_fill function. Doesn't passing a single pointer mean that we're passing the actual address of that struct in memory to that function? Wouldn't changing it's value result in changing the actual value it was pointing to? –  Smokie Jul 15 '12 at 6:43
1  
@Smokie: It does, but you also want to store a result somewhere to make l declared inside main "see" the change. If you change a value of a pointer that was passed "by value", the caller will not see the change. –  user405725 Jul 15 '12 at 6:48

You are not populating the pointer to the local variable l in your main() function. Instead you are populating the argument for l in your ll_fill() function. Consider having ll_fill return the value of the pointer that's malloc'ed.

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For practice purposes i'd like to pass l and initialize by pointer. Is it more than just good practice to return in these cases ? –  Smokie Jul 15 '12 at 6:34
    
Well in this case you are not really reading the pointer, only writing it, so it does not need to be an argument to your function, just a return value. –  Francis Upton Jul 15 '12 at 6:37
    
Got it, but what is the difference between passing it by pointer or just initializing a new list and returning it? I've seen these two types existing in POSIX functions.. is it good just in terms of practice? –  Smokie Jul 15 '12 at 6:46
1  
I find it simpler to just return the value, since that's what you are doing. A pointer to a pointer is a little more difficult to understand and really should only be used in the case where you cannot use the return value of the function (because it's already used for something else), or you have multiple "output" values. –  Francis Upton Jul 15 '12 at 6:49

When you call ll_fill(l, 10); - ask yourself, what is the value of l? Sure you create a new object inside the called function - but how does your main() know about that new object? It's still pointing to an uninitialized memory initially (randomly) assigned to your local variable l.

Try to assign a NULL as an initial value to your l:

struct ll *l = NULL;
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You are just confused in the concept of call byy value. You are passing the pointer by pass by value to the function ll-fill. But ll-fill will make its own copy and whatever changes it will do, it will not have any effect on the pointer of main function. So when you are passing it to the ll_print(), as it is not initialised so printing the value will just give you segmentation fault.
Use debugger it will help you always in such condition.

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Change your ll_fill function definition and call as follows:

void ll_fill(struct ll **l, int n){
  struct ll *temp= NULL;
  while (n>0){
    *l= (struct ll*)malloc(sizeof(struct ll));
    (*l)->n=n;
    (*l)->next= temp;
    temp=(*l);
    n--;
  }
}

int main(void){
  int i=0;
  struct ll *l;                                                                 
  ll_fill(&l, 10);
  ll_print(l);  /** now no segmntation fault :) **/                             
}
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Since you are allocating the memory for the pointer l inside a function you need to pass the address of the pointer instead of passing a pointer variable. Though pointer l is initialized inside the function ll_fill, the scope dies when it comes out of the function and ll_print(l) throws the segfault as it could not find the address of the pointer l.

Solution :

  1. Pass the address of the pointer if wanted to initialise inside a function.

  2. If the pointer is shared by the more than one it is always good to declare in the common scope of both the function (that is to initialise within main())

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