Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to use a custom format for assembly versions, when building them with MSBuild?

For example, we tried to use a version like "0.16.10r2.10717" But we got this error:

error emitting 'system.reflection.assemblyversionattribute' -- The version specified '0.16.10r2.10717' is invalid.

I searched around the web, but seems no one asked for a solution of this. Is it possible?

We use Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, and FinalBuilder 7 for building our project.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

AssemblyVersion and AssemblyFileVersion both must be composed of up to four integers, period-separated, each of which is no larger than 65534 (UInt16.MaxValue-1). Any of the following are valid (C# syntax):

[assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.2.3.4")]

// Let the compiler generate the build and/or revision numbers
[assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.2.3.*")]
[assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.2.*")]

There is another attribute, AssemblyInformationalVersion, that accepts a string as the version; it can be used when you want to use more complicated strings (especially when including a commit ID from a DVCS).

// Use complex version number
[assembly: AssemblyInformationalVersion("0.16.10r2.10717")]

// Include Git commit ID
[assembly: AssemblyInformationalVersion("1.2b1-g39d1c0f")]

Briefly, the difference between these attributes is:

  • AssemblyVersion: This is used as the CLR version of the assembly. When the assembly has a strong-name, this is the version that is validated against.

  • AssemblyFileVersion: This is the Win32 file version resource, and is displayed in the assembly's properties in Windows Explorer.

  • AssemblyInformationalVersion: This is accessible at runtime via the Application.ProductVersion property. It is also used in the Application.UserAppDataDirectory path.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.