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I have validate :my_validate in my User model, but my_validate is never called if "has_may :through" attribute is changed. Is it right behavior?

My code:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  has_many :roles, :through => :user_roles

  validate :my_validate
  def my_validate
    raise 123
  end

This throws exception:

User.find(1).name = 'new_name'

This works:

User.find(1).roles = []

I understand that user table is not updating so rails think validating is not necessary, but it looks really weird.

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1 Answer 1

User.find(1).name = 'new_name' 

It is throwing exception because you want to assign name with some value and try to saving value to users table, In validate methods "my_validate" you are raising some error, means it will throw an error if you want to save any value.

User.find(1).roles = []

But in second methods you are assign some value to roles table not in users table. That wise it is not throwing any error.

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"I understand that user table is not updating so rails think validating is not necessary, but it looks really weird." –  Vadim Pushtaev Jul 16 '12 at 7:51
    
I believe validation is not about "tables", it should be about "models". "roles" and "name" are both attributes, they should behave equally despite of their inner representation. –  Vadim Pushtaev Jul 16 '12 at 7:59
    
I mean that when you use save methods in user model it try to save data in your table, example user = User.find(1).name = 'new_name' and user.save that time it will try to store data in users table. –  Sandip Mondal Jul 16 '12 at 9:08

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