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C++: undefined reference to static class member

The following C++ code compiles well (using g++ -c) but it doesn't link giving the error: undefined reference toAbc::X'`

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Abc {

public:
    const static int X = 99;
};

int main()
{
    Abc a1;
    cout << &(Abc::X) << endl;
}

I want to know why this is not allowed?

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marked as duplicate by xdazz, Lol4t0, Henrik, Ajay, Jonathan Wakely Jul 15 '12 at 10:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the static member is used in a way which requires an lvalue (i.e. in a way that requires it to have an address) then it must have a definition. See the explanation at the GCC wiki, which includes references to the standard and how to fix it.

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You need to have that static member actually defined, not just declared...

Add this line before your main():

const int Abc::X = 99;
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1  
Also change the statement inside class to this: const static int X; –  Zohaib Jul 15 '12 at 7:18
1  
I was hoping Ravi would do that on his own as an additional credit ;-) –  YePhIcK Jul 15 '12 at 7:20

If you don't like to think about translation units, static initialization order and stuff like that, just change your static constants into methods.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Abc {

public:
    inline static const int& X(){ 
      static int x=99;
      return x; 
    }
};

int main()
{
//    Abc a1;
    cout << &(Abc::X()) << endl;
}
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In fact not looking for a quick solution. Would be glad to read detailed explanation (or links to explanations) about "translation units, static initialization order and stuff like that". –  Xolve Jul 15 '12 at 7:47
    
Right. There's a lot about those words on SO and google. Or even better, any entry-level book from this list: stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/…, perhaps I'll add more later. –  Johan Lundberg Jul 15 '12 at 8:12

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