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I use the following function to create instances of functions in JavaScript from an array of arguments:

var instantiate = function (instantiate) {
    return function (constructor, args, prototype) {
        "use strict";

        if (prototype) {
            var proto = constructor.prototype;
            constructor.prototype = prototype;
        }

        var instance = instantiate(constructor, args);
        if (proto) constructor.prototype = proto;
        return instance;
    };
}(Function.prototype.apply.bind(function () {
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
    var constructor = Function.prototype.bind.apply(this, [null].concat(args));
    return new constructor;
}));

Using the above function you can create instances as follows (see the fiddle):

var f = instantiate(F, [], G.prototype);

alert(f instanceof F); // false
alert(f instanceof G); // true

f.alert(); // F

function F() {
    this.alert = function () {
        alert("F");
    };
}

function G() {
    this.alert = function () {
        alert("G");
    };
}

The above code works for user built constructors like F. However it doesn't work for native constructors like Array for obvious security reasons. You may always create an array and then change its __proto__ property but I am using this code in Rhino so it won't work there. Is there any other way to achieve the same result in JavaScript?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

You can't fully subclass an array.

However, you can use Object.create to remove a lot of complexity from your current code (ex).

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How would you use Object.create to remove complexity from my code? I would appreciate it if you could write a demo. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 7 '12 at 14:21
    
I have added an example link to my answer. Please note that it doesn't work on Ideone's rhino version (but it works fine with mine, 1.7r3). –  Maël Nison Aug 7 '12 at 14:27
    
Your method works for most constructors. However it causes problems when a factory function is used as a constructor (e.g. Array). Using Object.create(Array.prototype) creates an object which is an instanceof the constructor Array. However it's not actually an array. My function may seem a little more complex however it avoids the problems presented by your function. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 7 '12 at 15:43
    
Is it better ? jsfiddle.net/MMp5u/6 –  Maël Nison Aug 7 '12 at 16:08
    
It is indeed better. Your script has two problems: it still doesn't work well with factory constructors (mine does), and neither does it work well with an array-like structure as the second argument (e.g. arguments). Mine handles that too. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 7 '12 at 19:42

I don't think you are achieving what you are intending here. First in your F and G functions you are defining an alert function on the this object. This means every time you instantiate an object a new function object will be created and assigned to alert. This is not what you want, you need to define alert on the prototype of F and G.

function F() { }

F.prototype.alert = function() {
    alert("F");
};

function G() { }

G.prototype.alert = function() {
    alert("G");
};  

However you still have an issue in your instantiate function. If you call it the way you have

var f = instantiate(F, [], G.prototype);

all you are doing is setting f's prototype to G.prototype, which is not what I think you want. I'm assuming that if you instantiate an F object then you would want to be able to call all of the functions defined on F.prototype, but the way things stand this is not the case.

function F() { }

F.prototype.alert = function() {
    alert("F");
};

F.prototype.foo = function() {
    alert("F foo");
};

function G() { }

G.prototype.alert = function() {
    alert("G");
};  


var f = instantiate(F, [], G.prototype);
f.foo(); // error!

The reason for the error here is like I said you just assign f's prototype to G.prototype and G.prototype does not have a foo function defined.

If you are looking to do inheritance in this way take a look at John Resig's blog he has a nice implemantation: http://ejohn.org/blog/simple-javascript-inheritance/

Also Douglas Crockford has put together some good examples: http://www.crockford.com/javascript/inheritance.html

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Haha. Actually that's precisely what I want. I created an instantiate function which accepts a constructor function and an args list and returns an instance of the constructor. If you pass an optional prototype object as the third parameter then it sets the internal [[proto]] property of the instance to that prototype. This is the intended behavior. So when I call instantiate(F, [], G.prototype) then it should create an instance of F but it should use G.prototype instead of F.prototype as the prototype of the instance. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 9 '12 at 2:10
    
The reason I wrote the alert function inside F and G is to show the difference that although f is constructed by F (and hence f.alert() displays F) it's internal [[proto]] property is set to G.prototype. Hence it's an instanceof the function G. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 9 '12 at 2:14
    
If you think about it it would be counter-intuitive to have an optional third prototype parameter if I never wanted to change the internal [[proto]] property of f from F.prototype to G.prototype. Since it's optional if I had left it out then f would inherit from F.prototype (which is the behavior you proposed is correct). However the intention is to modify the internal [[proto]] property of the instance without the need to manually modify __proto__. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 9 '12 at 2:19
    
Also thank you for the links. However I believe my own understanding of inheritance is JavaScript is complete enough. You may read my answer on prototype-based inheritance and my code for classical OOP in JavaScript. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 9 '12 at 2:23
    
There was a part of me that knew you were intending to do as you wrote. I just never saw that type of inheritance before so I was a bit misled. cheers! –  hackattack Aug 9 '12 at 3:34

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