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What is the best way people have found to do String to Lower case / Upper case in C++?

The issue is complicated by the fact that C++ isn't an English only programming language. Is there a good multilingual method?

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3  
Be aware that the current solution is not Unicode compatible. –  sorin Mar 8 '10 at 15:57

9 Answers 9

up vote 25 down vote accepted
#include <algorithm>
std::string data = "Abc";
std::transform(data.begin(), data.end(), data.begin(), ::toupper);

http://notfaq.wordpress.com/2007/08/04/cc-convert-string-to-upperlower-case/

Also, CodeProject article for common string methods: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/stl/STL_string_util.aspx

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1  
You should say that one needs to #include <algorithm> to use transform –  c0m4 Dec 4 '08 at 12:14
7  
I think it's better to use "dumb quotes" in such example of a string literal, rather than “smart quotes”. It makes it better in terms of copy-paste-compile. –  Ron Klein Jan 19 '10 at 8:58
3  
How will this work for non-ASCII strings? –  Nikolai Sep 12 '13 at 17:40
> std::string data = “Abc”; 
> std::transform(data.begin(), data.end(), data.begin(), ::toupper);

This will work, but this will use the standard "C" locale. You can use facets if you need to get a tolower for another locale. The above code using facets would be:

locale loc("");
const ctype<char>& ct = use_facet<ctype<char> >(loc);
transform(str.begin(), str.end(), std::bind1st(std::mem_fun(&ctype<char>::tolower), &ct));
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1  
Good pointer thanks! –  viksit Jul 12 '10 at 20:37

For copy-pasters hoping to use Nic Strong's answer, note the spelling error in "use_factet" and the missing third parameter to std::transform:

locale loc("");
const ctype<char>& ct = use_factet<ctype<char> >(loc);
transform(str.begin(), str.end(), std::bind1st(std::mem_fun(&ctype<char>::tolower), &ct));

should be

locale loc("");
const ctype<char>& ct = use_facet<ctype<char> >(loc);
transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), std::bind1st(std::mem_fun(&ctype<char>::tolower), &ct));
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Thanks Hexetic, looks like GMan cleaned it up for us :) –  Nic Strong Mar 10 '10 at 8:30

You should also review this question. Basically the problem is that the standard C/C++ libraries weren't built to handle Unicode data, so you will have to look to other libraries.

This may change as the C++ standard is updated. I know the next compiler from Borland (CodeGear) will have Unicode support, and I would guess Microsoft's C++ compiler will have, or already has string libraries that support Unicode.

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As Darren told you, the easiest method is to use std::transform.

But beware that in some language, like German for instance, there isn't always a one to one mapping between lower and uppercase. The "esset" lowercase character (look like the Greek character beta) is transformed to "SS" in uppercase.

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If you have Boost, then it has the simplest way. Have a look at to_upper()/to_lower() in Boost string algorithms.

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I have found a way to convert the case of unicode (and multilingual) characters, but you need to know/find (somehow) the locale of the character:

#include <locale.h>

_locale_t locale = _create_locale(LC_CTYPE, "Greek");
AfxMessageBox((CString)""+(TCHAR)_totupper_l(_T('α'), locale));
_free_locale(locale);

I haven't found a way to do that yet... I someone knows how, let me know.

Setting locale to NULL doesn't work...

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What Steve says is right, but I guess that if your code had to support several languages, you could have a factory method that encapsulates a set of methods that do the relevant toUpper or toLower based on that language.

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The VCL has a SysUtils.hpp which has LowerCase(unicodeStringVar) and UpperCase(unicodeStringVar) which might work for you. I use this in C++ Builder 2009.

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