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Zend_Db_Adapter::update() returns the number of rows affected by the update operation. What is best way to determine if the query was successful?

$data = array(
    'updated_on'      => '2007-03-23',
    'bug_status'      => 'FIXED'
); 

$n = $db->update('bugs', $data, 'bug_id = 2');
share|improve this question
    
If it's not successfull - an exception will be thrown – zerkms Jul 15 '12 at 10:59
1  
@zerkms I think that unless there is an adapter issue or an incorrect query that throws a Zend_Db_Statement exception update will return 0 rows if no rows are affected. However you'll likely get a Mysql/pdo error about not enough parameters bound or some such. – RockyFord Jul 15 '12 at 11:18
    
@RockyFord: if there is an exception - nothing will be returned from that call ever – zerkms Jul 15 '12 at 11:22
    
I'm saying it won't always throw an exception. The only exception update throws is for an adapter conflict, every thing else would be peripheral. so assuming your syntax is correct and maybe the id is incorrect, you might get a sql error but you won't get a php exception. – RockyFord Jul 15 '12 at 11:29
    
@RockyFord: if there will be an sql error - it will be converted to an exception, won't it? "might get a sql error but you won't get a php exception" -- I'm sure there will be a php exception for that ;-) – zerkms Jul 15 '12 at 12:09
$data = array(
    'updated_on' => '2007-03-23',
    'bug_status' => 'FIXED',
);
$n = 0;
try {
    $n = $db->update('bugs', $data, 'bug_id = 2');
} catch (Zend_Exception $e) {
    die('Something went wrong: ' . $e->getMessage());
}
if (empty($n)) {
    die('Zero rows affected');
}
share|improve this answer

If you are just looking for a boolean return value, this solution is the best for handling success in the model:

class Default_Model_Test extends Zend_Db_Table {

public function updateTest($testId, $testData){

    try {

        $this->_db->update('test', $testData, array(
            'id = ?'        => $testId
        ));

        return true;

    }
    catch (Exception $exception){

        return false;

    }

}

}

But, a better solution would be to handling success from the controller level, because it is making the request:

class Default_Model_Test extends Zend_Db_Table {

    public function updateTest($testId, $testData){

        $this->_db->update('test', $testData, array(
            'id = ?'        => $testId
        ));

    }

}

class Default_TestController extends Zend_Controller_Action {

    public function updateAction(){

        try {

            $testId = $this->_request->getParam('testId');
            if (empty($testId)) throw new Zend_Argument_Exception('testId is empty');

            $testData = $this->_request->getPost();
            if (empty($testId)) throw new Zend_Argument_Exception('testData is empty');

            $testModel->updateTest($testId, $testData);

        }
        catch (Exception $exception){

            switch (get_class($exception)){

                case 'Zend_Argument_Exception': $message = 'Argument error.'; break;
                case 'Zend_Db_Statement_Exception': $message = 'Database error.'; break;
                case default: $message = 'Unknown error.'; break;

            }

        }

    }

}

This is an excellent solution when working with multiple resource types, using a switch on the exception type, and doing what is appropriate based on your program's needs. Nothing can escape this vacuum.

share|improve this answer

Maybe:

$data = array(
    'updated_on'      => '2007-03-23',

    'bug_status'      => 'FIXED'
);
$result = $db->update('bugs', $data, 'bug_id = 2');
if ($result < $numRows) {//pass in numRows as method arg or hardcode integer.
    //handle error
} else {
    return TRUE;
}

Try something like this with the idea being you want to verify that the number of records you wanted updated got updated.

share|improve this answer
    
number of actually updated rows depends on the original values. So even if $result equals to 0 - then it doesn't mean something wrong happened – zerkms Jul 15 '12 at 12:05

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